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In my app Im using different open source libraries , that throws different exceptions . I don’t have experience in dealing in way with exception handling ,I always just did the try/catch thing , when I know
there is problem . Now I like to build some kind of object that handles all exceptions inside it . and I don’t have idea how to start and even if it possible
For example I have my class A and B

Class A 
{
 void method1() 
{
  Foo foo = new foo // external lib throws throw std::bad_alloc();
}
};

Class B 
{
 Void method1() 
{
  Int d = m_foo[0] // external lib  throw std::runtime_error( message );
}
};

I want somehow to handle those kinds and others in central place in my application What strategy should I use ?

UPDATE :
after trying the suggestion offered and implemented the try/catch in the main of my application , the problem it never gets there when the exception throws all im getting is this but its never gets to the try/catch:
visual studio run time error

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1  
This error is happening because an instruction called assert(). This isntruction gets a conditional expresion between its brackets, and in case it turns to be false, it aborts execution and shows the dialog you are seeing. –  Baltasarq Feb 29 '12 at 11:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use a try... catch structure in your main() function. All exceptions of the C++ standard library derive from std::exception, so that's a good back up. However, you should discriminate all different kinds of exceptions, or at least, those more common. You can also create your own exceptions, as classes deriving from std::runtime_error. You can have multiple catch sections, but ordered from the one more specific to the more general one.

try {

// more things...

}
catch(const std::bad_alloc &ba)
{
    // memory error
    std::cerr << "Memory error" << std::endl;
    exit( EXIT_FAILURE );
}
catch(const std::runtime_error &re)
{
    // customized error, probably
    std::cerr << "ERROR: " << re.what() << std::endl;
    exit( EXIT_FAILURE );
}
catch(const std::exception &e)
{
    // general (unexpected) error
    std::cerr << "Unexpected ERROR: " << e.what() << std::endl;
    exit( EXIT_FAILURE );
}

Remember you need to #include stdexcept and exception. Hope this helps.

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so what is the benefits of exception class like in this link : cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/exceptions –  user63898 Feb 29 '12 at 8:56
    
You're given the basics of using exceptions in that link. Firstly, it introduces that anything can be thrown as an exception, and then starts with the exception hierarchy in the standard library. The benefits of using exception classes instead of numbers ot strings is precisely that you can discriminate among all kind of errors from the class of exception thrown. –  Baltasarq Feb 29 '12 at 11:21

Use a catch all/default exception handler.
If you use an ellipsis (...) as the parameter of catch, that handler will catch any exception:

try
{

}
catch(...)
{

}

However, note that using a catch all is an bad design and it hides your problem, rather you should handle each exception specifically and take appropriate action for each.

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1  
answer saved by the last comment! :) –  Nim Feb 29 '12 at 8:44

You can use a try/catch that catches all exceptions:

try
{

}
catch (...) //catches all exceptions
{

}
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typically you would use something similar to

#include <stdexcept>
try {
   ...
} catch (std::exception const& e) {
  // catches std::exception and derived, e.what() can be used to log the root cause
} catch (...) {
  // catches anything thrown, not only exceptions
}
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