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I trying to print out a dictionary in Python:

Dictionary = {"Forename":"Paul","Surname":"Dinh"}
for Key,Value in Dictionary.iteritems():
  print Key,"=",Value

Although the item "Forename" is listed first, but dictionaries in Python seem to be sorted by values, so the result is like this:

Surname = Dinh
Forename = Paul

How to print out these with the same order in code or the order when items are appended in (not sorted by values nor by keys)?

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2  
You could use an additional list of keys to determine the order –  Nobody Feb 29 '12 at 8:45
    
i'm thinking of using 2 lists (python arrays), then use "enumerate", but this is complex –  jondinham Feb 29 '12 at 8:48
3  
Do you also need the ability to access it quickly by key? –  David Robinson Feb 29 '12 at 8:50
4  
For dictionaries in Python, the order of elements is not guaranteed to be anything, so you can't assume that they are sorted by values. For example - >>> Dictionary = {"Forename":"Paul","Surname":"Daih", "Middle": "Zarah"} >>> for Key,Value in Dictionary.iteritems(): ... print Key,"=",Value ... Middle = Zarah Surname = Daih Forename = Paul –  ronakg Feb 29 '12 at 8:53
4  
As I mentioned earlier, the order of the elements in a dictionary is not guaranteed to be anything specific. I'm not sure that is the mechanism behind iteritems(). –  ronakg Feb 29 '12 at 9:06

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use a list of tuples (or list of lists). Like this:

Arr= [("Forename","Paul"),("Surname","Dinh")]
for Key,Value in Arr: 
    print Key,"=",Value

Forename = Paul
Surname = Dinh

you can make a dictionary out of this with:

Dictionary=dict(Arr)

And the correctly sorted keys like this:

keys = [k for k,v in Arr]

Then do this:

for k in keys: print k,Dictionary[k]

but I agree with the comments on your question: Would it not be easy to sort the keys in the required order when looping instead?

EDIT: (thank you Rik Poggi), OrderedDict does this for you:

od=collections.OrderedDict(Arr)
for k in od: print k,od[k]
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1  
Of course, yes. –  Felix Yan Feb 29 '12 at 8:52
1  
yes completely fine. –  Johan Lundberg Feb 29 '12 at 8:53
1  
[k for k,v in {}] doesn't provide any guarantee of sorted order. –  strcat Feb 29 '12 at 9:16
1  
@strcat: Typo, it should have been [k for k,v in Arr]. Thank you - Fixed. –  Johan Lundberg Feb 29 '12 at 9:21
2  
list of tuples is how OrderedDicts are implemented, if dictionary is the structure the OP is looking for, the he should just use them and save the conversion pain every time. –  Rik Poggi Feb 29 '12 at 9:25

I wonder if it is an ordered dict that you want:

>>> k = "one two three four five".strip().split()
>>> v = "a b c d e".strip().split()
>>> k
  ['one', 'two', 'three', 'four', 'five']
>>> v
  ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e']
>>> dx = dict(zip(k, v))
>>> dx
   {'four': 'd', 'three': 'c', 'five': 'e', 'two': 'b', 'one': 'a'}
>>> for itm in dx: 
        print(itm)

   four
   three
   five
   two
   one

>>> # instantiate this data structure from OrderedDict class in the Collections module
>>> from Collections import OrderedDict
>>> dx = OrderedDict(zip(k, v))
>>> for itm in dx:
        print(itm)

   one
   two
   three
   four
   five 

A dictionary created using the OrderdDict preserves the original insertion order.

Put another way, such a dictionary iterates over the key/value pairs according to the order in which they were inserted.

So for instance, when you delete a key and then add the same key again, the iteration order is changes:

>>> del dx['two']
>>> for itm in dx:
        print(itm)

       one
       three
       four
       five

>>> dx['two'] = 'b'
>>> for itm in dx:
        print(itm)

       one
       three
       four
       five
       two
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Why not to use the code from the question? –  lig Feb 29 '12 at 9:04
    
is that necessary in order for you to understand my answer? In fact, i did not use the OP's sample data for two reasons: (i) we are talking about ordered sequences here and the OP's data only has two keys-value pairs; and (ii) i chose keys and values for my sample data that allow a reader to easily see the point of my code--i.e., order preservation. –  doug Feb 29 '12 at 9:07

First of all dictionaries are not sorted at all nor by key, nor by value.

And basing on your description. You actualy need OrderedDict from collections module collections.OrderedDict

from collections import OrderedDict

my_dict = OrderedDict([("Forename", "Paul"), ("Surname", "Dinh")])

for key, value in my_dict.iteritems():
    print '%s = %s' % (key, value)

Note that you need to instantiate OrderedDict from list of tuples not from another dict as dict instance will shuffle the order of items before OrderedDict will be instantiated.

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You can use collections.OrderedDict. It's available in python2.7 and python3.2+.

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This may meet your need better:

Dictionary = {"Forename":"Paul","Surname":"Dinh"}
KeyList = ["Forename", "Surname"]
for Key in KeyList:
    print Key,"=",Dictionary[Key]
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but for most of the time i don't seem to know the list of keys –  jondinham Feb 29 '12 at 9:05
1  
So how do you know the sort :) –  Felix Yan Feb 29 '12 at 9:07
    
there's a case: let say the 'Dictionary' is passed back to me by a function. and i want to keep the order of values created by that function (thru 'append' for example) –  jondinham Feb 29 '12 at 9:13
1  
Then collections.OrderedDict from lig and strcat's anwsers fits better :) –  Felix Yan Feb 29 '12 at 9:15

'but dictionaries in Python are sorted by values' maybe I'm mistaken here but what game you that ideea? Dictionaries are not sorted by anything.

You would have two solutions, either keep a list of keys additional to the dictionary, or use a different data structure like an array or arrays.

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