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#include <stdio.h>
#include <wchar.h> 
int main()
{
    double f = 1717.1800000000001;
    wprintf(L"double      %.20G\n", f);
    return 0;
}

outputs (and expected below):

double      1717.1800000000000637
double      1717.1800000000001

This is on Ubuntu 11.10 x64 (but also when compiling for 32 bit).

The problem that I try to solve, is that on Windows it outputs the number exactly like in code, and I need to make low-level formatting (swprintf) to work like in Windows, for portability issues.

share|improve this question
    
1717.1800000000001 is not exactly representable as double, so you only get a value near to it in f. The value stored in f is exactly 1717.180000000000063664629124104976654052734375. The problem is now that windows does only output 17 significant digits, although 20 were requested (which is a known bug, AFAIK it's somewhere in their bug databse). If you can't limit the field length to a sane value (like 17), you need a wrapper to mimic this bug. –  hirschhornsalz Feb 29 '12 at 9:37
    
This is very interesting to know, can you remember the exact bug? This is what I need, to make linux version to work like Windows even with its bugs. –  queen3 Feb 29 '12 at 9:46
    
Actually I set .17 instead of .20 and now linux/windows are completely compatible. If you change your comment to answer I'd gladly accept it. But if you can find the exact bug link it would be even more helpful. –  queen3 Feb 29 '12 at 9:49
    
I don't remember the bug number, but I remember it has been closed as WONTFIX. So you can probably rely on it. –  hirschhornsalz Feb 29 '12 at 9:50
    
I'll try to find it. –  hirschhornsalz Feb 29 '12 at 9:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

1717.1800000000001 is not exactly representable as double, so you only get a value near to it in f. The value stored in f is exactly 1717.180000000000063664629124104976654052734375.

The problem is now that windows does only output 17 significant digits, although 20 were requested (which is a known bug, AFAIK it's somewhere in their bug database).

If you can't limit the field length to a sane value (like "%.17G"), you need a wrapper to mimic this bug.

share|improve this answer
    
The bug seems to be this: connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/329278/… –  queen3 Feb 29 '12 at 11:58
2  
@queen3: Yes, that's the bug report (I wrote it). See my article exploringbinary.com/… for the gory details. –  Rick Regan Feb 29 '12 at 13:33
    
@queen3: Well spotted. Interesting to see the story behind that bug. –  hirschhornsalz Feb 29 '12 at 13:51

wprintf function is implemented by standard C library, not by gcc.

Number 1717.1800000000001 has 13 digits after the floating point. However, it doesn't have exact representation in 64-bit binary floating point format.

Format "%.20G" requires outputting 20 significant digits which is the count of digits in 1717.1800000000000637. Hence this output is what expected. Either Windows standard C library treats the format differently or makes incorrect rounding.

On the other hand, you can require a specific number of digits after the floating point by using "%f" format, e.g. "%.13f" rounds the output to exactly 13 digits after the floating point an it prints 1717.1800000000001 as expected.

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Well, your expected output conflicts with your format string. "%.20G" means you want 20 significant digits, and that's what you're getting. If you want 17 significant digits, as your expected output has, use "%.17G".

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double f = 1717.1800000000001;

This line of code cannot be executed accurately. The constant has 17 decimal digits of precision, a double has 15.9.

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The value given by the OP can't be exactly represented, that much is true. But the rest of your answer is wrong, which can be shown quite easily: The line f=1717.180000000000063664629124104976654052734375 would be executed accuratly, although it has even more digits. –  hirschhornsalz Feb 29 '12 at 9:44
    
But that's not what's in the line of code that can't be executed accurately, is it? And you are going to have to show me the binary representation of 1717.180000000000063664629124104976654052734375 because a double still only has 53 bits, and that value needs more. –  EJP Feb 29 '12 at 10:07
    
No, it does need exactly 53 bits. Just try it. Execute with an calcluator which is able to handle arbitrary length arithmetic (like gp) "15466982416256137216.0 / 2^53" –  hirschhornsalz Feb 29 '12 at 10:10

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