Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a datetime object created from which I subtract 13 days as follow:

(date.today()-timedelta(days=13)).strftime('%Y-%m-%d')

The strangeness occurs when I execute the code at 6AM and 8:30AM. At 6AM, the resulting string is returned as (if today is 2012-02-29):

2012-02-15

which is 14 days before the current! However, running the same line at 8:30AM, the resulting string is returned as:

2012-02-16

Which then correct. So far I have not been able to figure out what the difference is between the small period of time. I use timezone naive datetime objects, if that is important. I would like to know what could cause this change in the resulting string date.

Many thanks.

EDIT: (based on eumiro's suggestion below)

datetime.datetime.now() returns:

>>> datetime.datetime(2012, 2, 29, 10, 46, 20, 659862) 

And the timezone is Europe/Vienna on the server and in the django application that runs the line of code.

I also tried running a similar line to the one you suggested:

(pytz.timezone(settings.TIME_ZONE).localize(datetime.now(), is_dst=True) - \
    timedelta(days=13)).strftime('%Y-%m-%d') 

But with the same results... which is why I think I don't think it has much to do with timezones also. But at the same time not sure where else to look.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You live somewhere in America? This is the place where the timezones are around 6-8 hours behind the UTC and that's the time of UTC midnight.

What does datetime.datetime.now() return?

If you want to get the real local time, use this (replace "America/New_York" with your timezone):

from datetime import datetime, timedelta
import pytz

now = datetime.datetime.now(pytz.timezone("America/New_York"))
dt = (now - timedelta(days=13)).strftime('%Y-%m-%d')

and it should return the same correct values from midnight until midnight.

share|improve this answer
    
datetime.datetime.now() returns: datetime.datetime(2012, 2, 29, 10, 46, 20, 659862) And the timezone is Europe/Vienna on the server and in the django application that runs the line of code. I also tried running a similar line to the one you suggested: (pytz.timezone(settings.TIME_ZONE).localize(datetime.now(), is_dst=True)-timedelta(days=13)).strftime('%Y-%m-%d') But with the same results... which is why I am very confused. Could it be the is_dst=True in the above line? Thank you for the reply. –  Edvinas Feb 29 '12 at 9:47
    
DST issues in Austria are always within maximum two hours off UTC, so that is not the issue with apparently American timezone (6-8 hours). –  eumiro Feb 29 '12 at 9:53

Unfortunately DST is poorly supported in Python.

Even pytz is not perfect, but can be made to work with hacks.

You have to decide what it means to subtract 2 days from 10th, 1p.m., either 2 calendar days or 48 hours or 172800 seconds.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.