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I have a chunk of XML I would like to handle. I am writing this in C# but will use psuedocode to explain what I want to do. Please let me know if you need any more information. In C#, I load the XML into an XMLDocument as follows:

XmlDocument templateDoc = new XmlDocument();
            templateDoc.LoadXml(selectionTemplate);
            XmlNodeList orderNodes = templateDoc.GetElementsByTagName("order");

XML:

<sort>
  <order name="panelCode">
  <panelCode/>
  </order>
  <order name="panelName">
  <panelName/>
  </order>
  <order name="panelPart">
  <panelPart/>
  </order>
  <order name="numberLayers">descending
  <numberLayers/>
    <panelCode>ascending|ascending
    </panelCode>
  </order>
</sort>

Psuedocode:

foreach ( orderNode )
{
  if ( order node title matches my string )
  {
    if ( order node text is ascending or descending ) //This check Im struggling with as I only want to check the order node text and not include any child node text in the comparison. 
    {
       switch ascending with descending and vice versa //If i set the inner text of the order node it will effect the text contained within its child nodes.
    }
    else //order node text is blank
    {
       set ordernode text to be ascending //Again its the child nodes that could cause an issue. 
    }
  }
  else // order node title does not match string
  {
     if ( order node text is ascending or descending )
     {
       remove order node text whilst maintaining the inner text of any child nodes. //Again its the child nodes that could cause an issue.
     }
  }
}

As an example of how this would work...

If my string was panelCode I would loop through all the order nodes. The first would be a match so I would set the value of that order node to "ascending". I would then loop through the rest of the order nodes looking for any of them that have a value of ascending/descending. This would be true of the numberLayers order node whose value I would like to set to "" but maintain the values of the child nodes e.g ascending|ascending. So the parsed document would look like the following.

New XML:

<sort>
  <order name="panelCode">ascending
  <panelCode/>
  </order>
  <order name="panelName">
  <panelName/>
  </order>
  <order name="panelPart">
  <panelPart/>
  </order>
  <order name="numberLayers">
  <numberLayers/>
    <panelCode>ascending|ascending
    </panelCode>
  </order>
</sort>

If the string I had were numberLayers the supplied XML would turn out as follows:

<sort>
  <order name="panelCode">
  <panelCode/>
  </order>
  <order name="panelName">
  <panelName/>
  </order>
  <order name="panelPart">
  <panelPart/>
  </order>
  <order name="numberLayers">ascending
  <numberLayers/>
    <panelCode>ascending|ascending
    </panelCode>
  </order>
</sort>
share|improve this question
    
I don't fully understand what you need to achieve. Can you give some more context information? –  Efrain Feb 29 '12 at 11:43
    
I have edited the original answer. Please let me know if htis helps or not. What is it specifically you are getting lost on? –  user589195 Feb 29 '12 at 12:09
    
Ok, I understand now. Hmm.. I don't see an elegant way at the moment. anyway, I'll quickly try to translate your pseudo-code to real code. ;) –  Efrain Feb 29 '12 at 12:42
    
The bit I have the issue with is identifying and changing the value of an order node without interfering with the values of any of its child nodes. –  user589195 Feb 29 '12 at 12:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok, I think I have your answer:

What is a bit tricky about your XML structure is that you have text nodes and other xml-nodes (such as <panelCode/>) on the same level. And the trick to deal with that is the text() selector in XPath expressions. Here's what I would write:

string targetName = "numberLayers";

// grab the first matching order node
XmlNode matchOrderNode= xmldoc.SelectSingleNode(
                  "//order[@name='" + targetName + "']"); 

// try to grab the first #text leaf node, if not existing, append new 
XmlNode matchTextChildNode = matchOrderNode.SelectSingleNode("./text()"); 
if (matchTextChildNode == null)
{
       matchTextChildNode = matchOrderNode.AppendChild(xmldoc.CreateTextNode(string.Empty));
}

// determine whether 'ascending' is set already --> toggle
string textToSetAfterwards = "ascending";
if (matchTextChildNode.Value == "ascending")
{
    textToSetAfterwards = "descending";
}

// clear all ascending/descending text nodes
foreach (XmlNode orderNode in xmldoc.SelectNodes(
       "//order[text()='ascending' or text()='descending']/text()"))
{
    orderNode.Value = string.Empty;
}

// re-set only the matched node's value
matchTextChildNode.Value = textToSetAfterwards;

You see, you can use XPath to select #text-leaf-nodes directly. Those #text nodes actually have their plain-text content (such as "ascending" or "descending") in their .Value property, which can be read and set!

share|improve this answer
    
Looks good. I had managed to google the /text() xpath stuff but wasnt sure how to use it. I'll try implementing this and let you know how it goes. Thanks very much :D –  user589195 Feb 29 '12 at 13:09
    
There is a problem with this code efrain. It works fine for if you are flipping ascending and decending. But if you are wanting to set a new node to ascending the line XmlNode match = templateDoc.SelectSingleNode( "//order[@name='" + columnName + "']/text()[1]"); does not return an element as there is no text within the node. –  user589195 Feb 29 '12 at 13:29
    
ah, you were faster. anyway, I think we did the same thing, more or less. ;) –  Efrain Feb 29 '12 at 13:51
    
yeh it looks very simmilar. Thanks very much for your help mate :D would give u 5 points if I could. Thanks again. The explanation u gave was good aswell as I was then able to progress the answer myself instead of just giving the answer –  user589195 Feb 29 '12 at 14:02

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