Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need to determine the version of SQL Server (2000, 2005 or 2008 in this particular case) that a connection string connects a C# console application (.NET 2.0). Can anyone provide any guidance on this?

Thanks, MagicAndi

Update

I would like to be able to determine the SQL Server version form the ADO.NET connection object if possible.

share|improve this question
up vote 14 down vote accepted

This code will determine the version of SQL Server database being used - 2000, 2005 or 2008:

try
{
    SqlConnection sqlConnection = new SqlConnection(connectionString);
    Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server server = new Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server(new Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.ServerConnection(sqlConnection));

    switch (server.Information.Version.Major)
    {
      case 8:
        MessageBox.Show("SQL Server 2000");
        break;
      case 9:
        MessageBox.Show("SQL Server 2005");
        break;
      case 10:
        MessageBox.Show("SQL Server 2008");
    			break;
      default:
        MessageBox.Show(string.Format("SQL Server {0}", server.Information.Version.Major.ToString())); 
        break;   
    }
}
catch (Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.ConnectionFailureException)
{
    MessageBox.Show("Unable to connect to server",
        "Invalid Server", MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Error);

}

The code below will do the same, this time using NinthSense's answer:

try
{   	
    SqlConnection sqlConnection = new SqlConnection(connectionString);
    sqlConnection.Open();

    string serverVersion = sqlConnection.ServerVersion;
    string[] serverVersionDetails = serverVersion.Split( new string[] {"."}, StringSplitOptions.None);

    int versionNumber = int.Parse(serverVersionDetails[0]);

    switch (versionNumber)
    {
    	case 8:
        	MessageBox.Show("SQL Server 2000");
    		break;
    	case 9:
    		MessageBox.Show("SQL Server 2005");
    		break;
    	case 10:
    		MessageBox.Show("SQL Server 2008");
    		break;
    	default:
    		MessageBox.Show(string.Format("SQL Server {0}", versionNumber.ToString()));  
    		break;  
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    MessageBox.Show(string.Format("Unable to connect to server due to exception: {1}", ex.Message),
        "Invalid Connection!", MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Error);

}
finally
{
    sqlConnection.Close();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Richard, excellent catch on the Smo.Server! My bad :-( – MagicAndi Jun 4 '09 at 11:37
SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection("Server=localhost;Database=test;user=admin;password=123456;");
con.Open();
Text = con.ServerVersion;
con.Close();

con.ServerVersion will give you:

  • 9.x.x for SQL Server 2005
  • 10.x.x for SQL Server 2008
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 neat ! wasn't aware of this. – marc_s Jun 4 '09 at 11:25
1  
The marked answer to this question is insanely complex, posted two minutes after the question was asked, and by the same author. The actual correct answer to this question is this one. Very simple one liner, as it should be. – Brain2000 Oct 19 '15 at 19:48
    
I recently blogged a complex, but not-sql-server-dependant solution for this - blog.ninethsense.com/2015/09/… – NinethSense Oct 21 '15 at 3:11

Run this script from a normal SqlCommand - it's quite extensive and useful!

SELECT  
    SERVERPROPERTY('productversion') as 'Product Version', 
    SERVERPROPERTY('productlevel') as 'Patch Level',  
    SERVERPROPERTY('edition') as 'Product Edition',
    SERVERPROPERTY('buildclrversion') as 'CLR Version',
    SERVERPROPERTY('collation') as 'Default Collation',
    SERVERPROPERTY('instancename') as 'Instance',
    SERVERPROPERTY('lcid') as 'LCID',
    SERVERPROPERTY('servername') as 'Server Name'

Marc

share|improve this answer
1  
Marc_s, Wasn't quite what I was looking for, but very useful regardless! +1 – MagicAndi Jun 4 '09 at 11:35

Try

Select @@version

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms177512(SQL.90).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
thijs, I could use this, but was looking for an way of determining the version information from the ADO.NET connection. I will update the question accordingly. – MagicAndi Jun 4 '09 at 11:02
    
fire this select with an ExecuteScalar and parse the result... – thijs Jun 4 '09 at 11:28

The Server version is also available as a (string) property on the Connection object and as a SqlVersion property on the ServerConnection.

And SQl2008 is version >= 10

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.