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I have been researching into when data is being accessed or shared by multiple threads within Java. And looking into the problems such as:

  • Thread Interference
  • Memory Consistency
  • Deadlock
  • Starvation

From this, solutions to solve these problems.

So far all I seem find to fixing these problems is by using a synchronizing method. Are there other alternatives to using a synchronizing method? I have found most of this information from the sun Java tutorial. Any recommendations on further reading?

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closed as off-topic by Pang, J0e3gan, Dennis Meng, Jim Garrison, IainDunning Jan 19 at 5:05

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Off topic for stackoverflow. Please read the FAQ. Perhaps programmers stack exchange is where you want to post this. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 29 '12 at 12:55
+1 to Hovercraft's comment – Toby Mar 1 '12 at 8:29

1 Answer 1

Try to keep your data read-only (immutable) if possible or copy them to have it thread-local as a general advice.

In Java there are several special non-blocking implementations of counters (AtomicInteger, AtomicLong, etc.) and Collections (java.util.concurrent.*) to use if you need to avoid synchronization for your data.

I can recommend the book "Effective Java" (Joshua Bloch) or "Java concurrency in practice".

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If you could only get one of the books above - whats better? Effective Java or Java concurrency in practice? – NightWolf Mar 2 '12 at 1:31
Effective Java is a general book on how to write good and maintainable code. It also helps to avoid several pitfalls in java. Java concurrency in practice is specialized on concurrency and for in-depth study of that topic. I would suggest to just go to a local bookstore and look for yourself which one fits your needs. Alternatively you can look at the index of the books to have an overview of the topics: JCIP, EJ – Benjamin Mar 5 '12 at 9:54

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