Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In WCF Web API I had a class of similar structure:

public class SomeController : ApiController
{
    [WebGet(UriTemplate = "{itemSource}/Items")]
    public SomeValue GetItems(CustomParam parameter) { ... }

    [WebGet(UriTemplate = "{itemSource}/Items/{parent}")]
    public SomeValue GetChildItems(CustomParam parameter, SomeObject parent) { ... }
}

Since we could map individual methods, it was very simple to get the right request at the right place. For similar class which had only a single GET method but also had an Object parameter, I successfully used IActionValueBinder. However, in the case described above I get the following error:

Multiple actions were found that match the request: 

SomeValue GetItems(CustomParam parameter) on type SomeType

SomeValue GetChildItems(CustomParam parameter, SomeObject parent) on type SomeType

I am trying to approach this problem by overriding the ExecuteAsync method of ApiController but with no luck so far. Any advice on this issue?

Edit: I forgot to mention that now I am trying to move this code on ASP.NET Web API which has a different approach to routing. The question is, how do I make the code work on ASP.NET Web API?

share|improve this question
1  
Have you still got the {parent} as RouteParameter.Optional? –  Antony Scott Feb 29 '12 at 19:10
    
Yes, I did. Maybe I am using the IActionValueBinder the wrong way because for types such as int id (as in the demo) it does work fine. –  paulius_l Feb 29 '12 at 19:39
    
Sorry, I should have been clearer. I would've thought that having it as optional would mean it matches the Item route as well as the sub-items route, which would explain the error message you're seeing. –  Antony Scott Feb 29 '12 at 19:48
    
We are currently having the disscussion, if the approaches below (with multiple routes) are against proper REST rules? In my opinion this is fine. My coworker thinks it's not nice. Any comments on this? –  Remy Aug 30 '12 at 14:13
    
I was generally against it when started reading about REST. I am still not sure if that is a proper approach but sometimes it is more convenient or user-friendly, so slightly bending the rules might not be so bad. As long as it works to solve a specific problem. 6 months have already passed since I have posted this question and we have not had any regrets for using this approach since. –  paulius_l Aug 30 '12 at 15:04

8 Answers 8

up vote 110 down vote accepted

This is the best way I have found to support extra GET methods and support the normal REST methods as well. Add the following routes to your WebApiConfig:

routes.MapHttpRoute("DefaultApiWithId", "Api/{controller}/{id}", new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }, new { id = @"\d+" });
routes.MapHttpRoute("DefaultApiWithAction", "Api/{controller}/{action}");
routes.MapHttpRoute("DefaultApiGet", "Api/{controller}", new { action = "Get" }, new { httpMethod = new HttpMethodConstraint(HttpMethod.Get) });
routes.MapHttpRoute("DefaultApiPost", "Api/{controller}", new {action = "Post"}, new {httpMethod = new HttpMethodConstraint(HttpMethod.Post)});

I verified this solution with the test class below. I was able to successfully hit each method in my controller below:

public class TestController : ApiController
{
    public string Get()
    {
        return string.Empty;
    }

    public string Get(int id)
    {
        return string.Empty;
    }

    public string GetAll()
    {
        return string.Empty;
    }

    public void Post([FromBody]string value)
    {
    }

    public void Put(int id, [FromBody]string value)
    {
    }

    public void Delete(int id)
    {
    }
}

I verified that it supports the following requests:

GET /Test
GET /Test/1
GET /Test/GetAll
POST /Test
PUT /Test/1
DELETE /Test/1

Note That if your extra GET actions do not begin with 'Get' you may want to add an HttpGet attribute to the method.

share|improve this answer
2  
This is a great answer and it helped me a lot with another related question. Thanks!! –  adaptive Oct 30 '12 at 0:17
1  
+1 I didn't know about the Regex constraint. –  nima May 29 '13 at 8:11
    
@sky-dev . Does this hold good even for PUT API? –  shivakumar Jun 5 '13 at 13:54
2  
Tried this -- does not appear to work. The routes are all randomly mapped to the GetBlah(long id) method. :( –  BrainSlugs83 Jun 17 '13 at 12:06
1  
@BrainSlugs83: It depends on the order. And you will want to add (to the "withId" methods), a constraints: new{id=@"\d+"} –  Eric Falsken Jun 17 '13 at 16:13

Go from this:

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute("API Default", "api/{controller}/{id}",
            new { id = RouteParameter.Optional });

To this:

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute("API Default", "api/{controller}/{action}/{id}",
            new { id = RouteParameter.Optional });

Hence, you can now specify which action (method) you want to send your HTTP request to.

posting to "http://localhost:8383/api/Command/PostCreateUser" invokes:

public bool PostCreateUser(CreateUserCommand command)
{
    //* ... *//
    return true;
}

and posting to "http://localhost:8383/api/Command/PostMakeBooking" invokes:

public bool PostMakeBooking(MakeBookingCommand command)
{
    //* ... *//
    return true;
}

I tried this in a self hosted WEB API service application and it works like a charm :)

share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks for the helpful answer. I'd like to add that if you start your method names with Get, Post, etc., your requests will map to those methods based on the HTTP verb used. But you can also name your methods anything, and then decorate them with the [HttpGet], [HttpPost], etc. attributes to map the verb to the method. –  idor_brad Jun 12 '13 at 19:21

You need to define further routes in global.asax.cs like this:

routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "Api with action",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{action}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);

routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "DefaultApi",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);
share|improve this answer
4  
Yep that's true but it would be nice to actually see an example of those routes. It would make this answer more valuable to the community. (and you'd get a +1 from me:) –  Aran Mulholland Oct 24 '12 at 2:32
    
You can read an example here - stackoverflow.com/questions/11407267/… –  Tom Kerkhove Nov 27 '12 at 11:11
2  
An actual solution would have been nicer. –  So Many Goblins Dec 30 '12 at 20:27
    
Not helpful at all. –  Henley Chiu Apr 1 '13 at 19:08

I am not sure if u have found the answer, but I did this and it works

public IEnumerable<string> Get()
{
    return new string[] { "value1", "value2" };
}

// GET /api/values/5
public string Get(int id)
{
    return "value";
}

// GET /api/values/5
[HttpGet]
public string GetByFamily()
{
    return "Family value";
}

Now in global.asx

routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");

routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "DefaultApi2",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{action}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);

routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "DefaultApi",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);

routes.MapRoute(
    name: "Default",
    url: "{controller}/{action}/{id}",
    defaults: new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional }
);
share|improve this answer

I find attributes to be cleaner to use than manually adding them via code. Here is a simple example.

[RoutePrefix("api/example")]
public class ExampleController : ApiController
{
    [HttpGet]
    [Route("get1/{param1}")] //   /api/example/get1/1?param2=4
    public IHttpActionResult Get(int param1, int param2)
    {
        Object example = null;
        return Ok(example);
    }

}

You also need this in your webapiconfig

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "DefaultApi",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "ActionApi",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{action}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);

Some Good Links http://www.asp.net/web-api/overview/getting-started-with-aspnet-web-api/tutorial-your-first-web-api This one explains routing better. http://www.asp.net/web-api/overview/web-api-routing-and-actions/routing-in-aspnet-web-api

share|improve this answer

None of the above examples worked for my personal needs. The below is what I ended up doing.

 public class ContainsConstraint : IHttpRouteConstraint
{       
    public string[] array { get; set; }
    public bool match { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Check if param contains any of values listed in array.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="param">The param to test.</param>
    /// <param name="array">The items to compare against.</param>
    /// <param name="match">Whether we are matching or NOT matching.</param>
    public ContainsConstraint(string[] array, bool match)
    {

        this.array = array;
        this.match = match;
    }

    public bool Match(System.Net.Http.HttpRequestMessage request, IHttpRoute route, string parameterName, IDictionary<string, object> values, HttpRouteDirection routeDirection)
    {
        if (values == null) // shouldn't ever hit this.                   
            return true;

        if (!values.ContainsKey(parameterName)) // make sure the parameter is there.
            return true;

        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(values[parameterName].ToString())) // if the param key is empty in this case "action" add the method so it doesn't hit other methods like "GetStatus"
            values[parameterName] = request.Method.ToString();

        bool contains = array.Contains(values[parameterName]); // this is an extension but all we are doing here is check if string array contains value you can create exten like this or use LINQ or whatever u like.

        if (contains == match) // checking if we want it to match or we don't want it to match
            return true;
        return false;             

    }

To use the above in your route use:

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute("Default", "{controller}/{action}/{id}", new { action = RouteParameter.Optional, id = RouteParameter.Optional}, new { action = new ContainsConstraint( new string[] { "GET", "PUT", "DELETE", "POST" }, true) });

What happens is the constraint kind of fakes in the method so that this route will only match the default GET, POST, PUT and DELETE methods. The "true" there says we want to check for a match of the items in array. If it were false you'd be saying exclude those in the strYou can then use routes above this default method like:

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute("GetStatus", "{controller}/status/{status}", new { action = "GetStatus" });

In the above it is essentially looking for the following URL => http://www.domain.com/Account/Status/Active or something like that.

Beyond the above I'm not sure I'd get too crazy. At the end of the day it should be per resource. But I do see a need to map friendly urls for various reasons. I'm feeling pretty certain as Web Api evolves there will be some sort of provision. If time I'll build a more permanent solution and post.

share|improve this answer
    
You can use new System.Web.Http.Routing.HttpMethodConstraint(HttpMethod.Get, HttpMethod.Post, HttpMethod.Put, HttpMethod.Delete) instead. –  abatishchev Jan 25 at 6:09

Have you tried switching over to WebInvokeAttribute and setting the Method to "GET"?

I believe I had a similar problem and switched to explicitly telling which Method (GET/PUT/POST/DELETE) is expected on most, if not all, my methods.

public class SomeController : ApiController
{
    [WebInvoke(UriTemplate = "{itemSource}/Items"), Method="GET"]
    public SomeValue GetItems(CustomParam parameter) { ... }

    [WebInvoke(UriTemplate = "{itemSource}/Items/{parent}", Method = "GET")]
    public SomeValue GetChildItems(CustomParam parameter, SomeObject parent) { ... }
}

The WebGet should handle it but I've seen it have some issues with multiple Get much less multiple Get of the same return type.

[Edit: none of this is valid with the sunset of WCF WebAPI and the migration to ASP.Net WebAPI on the MVC stack]

share|improve this answer
1  
I am sorry, I forgot to mention that I am moving the code to ASP.NET Web API since WCF Web API was discontinued. I edited the post. Thank you. –  paulius_l Feb 29 '12 at 16:25

Couldn't make any of the above routing solutions work -- some of the syntax seems to have changed and I'm still new to MVC -- in a pinch though I put together this really awful (and simple) hack which will get me by for now -- note, this replaces the "public MyObject GetMyObjects(long id)" method -- we change "id"'s type to a string, and change the return type to object.

// GET api/MyObjects/5
// GET api/MyObjects/function
public object GetMyObjects(string id)
{
    id = (id ?? "").Trim();

    // Check to see if "id" is equal to a "command" we support
    // and return alternate data.

    if (string.Equals(id, "count", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
    {
        return db.MyObjects.LongCount();
    }

    // We now return you back to your regularly scheduled
    // web service handler (more or less)

    var myObject = db.MyObjects.Find(long.Parse(id));
    if (myObject == null)
    {
        throw new HttpResponseException
        (
            Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.NotFound)
        );
    }

    return myObject;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.