Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Somehow my old question was closed, so I open a new one:

I am using Java Generics to implement a generic bidirectional Hash Map out of an SQL Query. It should be able to map any combination of String, Integer pairs back and forth. It should be used like this:

String sql = "SELECT string_val, int_val FROM map_table";
PickMap<String, Integer> pm1 = new PickMap<String, Integer>(sql);

String key1 = "seven";
Integer value1 = pm1.getLeft2Right(key1);

Integer key2 = 7;
String value2 = pm1.getRightToLeft(key2);

Of course it should be possible to create an pm (Integer, Integer) and so on...

My implementation of Pick Map looks like this (without the getter...):

public class PickMap<L, R> {

    private final HashMap<L, R> left2Right = new HashMap<L, R>();
    private final HashMap<R, L> right2Left = new HashMap<R, L>();

    public PickMap(String sql) throws OException {
        DTable d = new DTable(sql);
        int colTypeL = d.t.getColType(1);
        int colTypeR = d.t.getColType(2);
        Extractor<L> extLeft  = (Extractor<L>) getInstance(colTypeL);
        Extractor<R> extRight = (Extractor<R>) getInstance(colTypeR);    
        int numRows = d.t.getNumRows();
        for(int i=1;i<=numRows;i++) {
            L leftVal = extLeft.extract(d, i);
            R rightVal = extRight.extract(d, i);
            this.left2Right.put(leftVal, rightVal);
            this.right2Left.put(rightVal, leftVal);
        }
    }

    private Extractor<?> getInstance(int type) {
        if(type == 1)
            return new IntExtractor();
        else
            return new StringExtractor();
    }
}

interface Extractor<E> {
    E extract(DTable source, int row);
}

class IntExtractor implements Extractor<Integer> {

    @Override
    public Integer extract(DTable source, int row) {
        int value = 5;
        return new Integer(value);
    }
}

class StringExtractor implements Extractor<String> {

    @Override
    public String extract(DTable source, int row) {
        String retVal = "hello";
        return retVal;
    }
}

I have no compiler errors and I'm pretty sure, that it will work this way. BUT I'm getting unchecked cast warnings on the "getInstance" methods Where I cast Extractor(E) to Extractor(L)...

How should I cast properly? Or what am I missing? Or should I just suppress those warnings?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You're getting warnings because what you're doing can't be proved to be safe. You're assuming that getInstance(colTypeL) will return an Extractor<L> - but that can't be verified at either compile-time or execution time.

You can use @SuppressWarnings("unchecked") as mentioned by others, but I would try to rethink the design somewhat.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes yes, I understand your point. I would like to use the generic type L for instanciating my Extractor. So instead of giving the "colType" into the getInstance method, I would like to do some thing like getInstance(L) and getInstance(R)... Is that possible? I hate supressing warnings! –  Sauer Feb 29 '12 at 13:38
    
@Sauer: You'd have to know L and R at execution time, which normally means having constructor parameters of type Class<? extends L> and Class<? extends R> or something similar. –  Jon Skeet Feb 29 '12 at 13:39
6  
One possibility is to have the constructor take the extractors it needs: PickMap(String sql, Extractor<? extends L> leftExtractor, Extractor<? extends R> rightExtractor>). This not only makes the compilation safe, it also lets someone else come along and decide they want a PickMap<BigDecimal,Date> without having to change the PickMap code (assuming Extractor is an interface or class they have access to). –  yshavit Feb 29 '12 at 14:37

You can use the following annotation to make the compiler not output those warnings:

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")

See this related question which deals with the same issue. The answer there will explain everything you need to know.

share|improve this answer

use following anotation:

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.