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I would like invoke a method of an js object within the very same object method via setTimeout:

var ads = {

  init: function() {
    ads.display_ads();
  },

  display_ads: function() {
     console.log('Displaying Ads');
     setTimeout('ads.display_ads()', 5000);
  }
}

However, I'm getting this error message:

ads is not defined

setTimeout('ads.display_ads()', 2000);

What am I missing here? How would i alter the string within the setTimeout function?

Thanks for your help!

Edit: I use firefox on mac.

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If you pass a string to setTimeout, it is evaluated in global scope. Apparently, ads is not defined in global scope. The solution is not to pass a string. This has nothing to do with the fact that you call setTimeout in a function associated to an object property. –  Felix Kling Feb 29 '12 at 13:26
    
I see no error on chrome. Which browser are you on? –  bhups Feb 29 '12 at 13:27
    
Using strings in setTimout is just as bad as using eval() –  Evert Feb 29 '12 at 13:28
    
Inside init, you really should call this.display_ads() instead of ads..... Otherwise you might run into problems if you rename the variable or assign the object to another variable etc. –  Felix Kling Feb 29 '12 at 13:38
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just change it to ads.display_ads, note that this is not a String. i.e.

var ads = {
    init: function() {
        ads.display_ads();
    },
    display_ads: function() {
        console.log('Displaying Ads');
        setTimeout(ads.display_ads, 5000);
    }
}

As @FelixKling points out in his comment below, be careful about what this refers to in ads.display_ads. If ads.display_ads is called via ads.init() or ads.display_ads() this will be the ads Object. However, if called via setTimeout this will be window.

If the context is important though, you can pass an anonymous function to setTimeout, which in turn calls ads.display_ads():

setTimeout(function() {
    ads.display_ads();
}, 5000);

or

var self = this;
setTimeout(function() {
    self.display_ads();
}, 5000);
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1  
Inside display_ads, this will then refer to window. This might not be a problem, but is important to point out. –  Felix Kling Feb 29 '12 at 13:28
    
@FelixKling good point, thanks; have updated. –  jabclab Feb 29 '12 at 13:29
1  
Thank you for this detailed answer. This was an eye-opener. =) –  algi Feb 29 '12 at 13:42
    
Glad it helped :-) Thanks to @FelixKling too for flagging up the binding issue. –  jabclab Feb 29 '12 at 13:49
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try this.display_ads,

I'd recommend you to use this for referencing ads

so the code will be like:

var ads = {

  init: function() {
    this.display_ads();
  },

  display_ads: function() {
     console.log('Displaying Ads');
     setTimeout(this.display_ads, 5000);
  }
}
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This will only work the first time. When this.display_ads is executed a second time (through setTimeout), this.display_ads will be undefined, as this refers to window. –  Felix Kling Feb 29 '12 at 13:39
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So, like jakeclarkson said, ads.display_ads:

setTimeout(hitch(ads, ads.display_ads), 5000);

The difference is that you should use a "hitch" function:

function hitch(scope, callback) {
    return function () {
         return callback.apply(scope, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments));
    }
}

This function will ensure that the scope of the callback is your ads object. See MDN for a description of the apply function:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function/apply

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The answer of jabclab helped me greatly. I was trying to get a game loop to work, but it seems this was referencing window instead of the object I created. Here is a minimal version of the now running code (it just counts up each second and writes it into a div "content"):

function Game(model, renderer){
    this.model = model;
    this.renderer = renderer;
    this.run = function(){
        this.model.update();
        this.renderer.draw(this.model);
        var self = this;
        setTimeout(function(){self.run();}, 1000);
    };
}
function Model(){
    this.data = 0;
    this.update = function(){
        this.data++;
    };
}
function Renderer(){
    this.draw = function(model, interpolation){
        document.getElementById("content").innerHTML = model.data;
    };
}
var game = new Game(new Model(), new Renderer());
game.run();

Instead of setTimeout(this.run, 1000) I used self instead of this to clarify which object is meant (as suggested by jabclab). Thought I'd add this because I'm using an object constructor and has a slightly different syntax. Especially using ads.method didn't work (because Game is not an object yet I guess), so I had to use the last solution.

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