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I am maintaining a large Java EE system. Most of the business logic is converted from EJB:s into POJO:s configured in several spring context configuration files. EJB:s are mostly used as Facades, that looks up the business logic spring beans from a context composed of all spring context configuration files mentioned earlier. For this we use the AbstractStatelessSessionBean provided with the spring framework.

All these configuration files have the default-lazy-init=true directive, which means that the business logic beans are not created until they are actually used by the system. This is preferable most of the time since republishing in developer mode becomes faster.

But when large merges are made, we are having problems finding all the configuration errors, such as missing dependencies.

My idea is to write some form of integration test, with the purpose of finding those errors. This means, i think, that I need to find a way to override all default-lazy-init=true declarations when creating the application context.

Is there any way of doing this programmatically, or perhaps with some test-only context file that includes all the actual context files?

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Just wanted to mention that EJB3 beans are just as much POJOs as are POJO:s configured in several spring context configuration files. –  Arjan Tijms Mar 3 '12 at 10:27
    
Ok, we are stuck with EJB 2.x for the moment. We will probably move to EJB 3 in the future though. –  Jon Mar 5 '12 at 8:39
    
Sorry to hear that. EJB 2 is a device invented to torture developers :( Hope you'll be able to move to EJB 3 soon (it's from 2006 btw so it's really not that new) –  Arjan Tijms Mar 5 '12 at 22:38

3 Answers 3

Let's say currently you have a single applicationContext.xml file containing all bean definitions:

<beans default-lazy-init="true">

    <!-- all your beans -->

</beans>

Rename it to applicationContext-main.xml or something and remove default-lazy-init="true" attribute. Now create two applicationContext.xml files:

<beans default-lazy-init="true">

    <import resource="applicationContext-core.xml"/>

</beans>

and:

<beans default-lazy-init="false">

    <import resource="applicationContext-core.xml"/>

</beans>

As you can see the only difference is the value of default-lazy-init. During development your team can use the former version of applicationContext.xml that includes all the beans with lazy-init. On staging and testing environments switch it to the latter so that all beans included in applicationContext-core.xml are created eagerly.

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Thanks for the swift answer. Our configuration files have a rather complex structure of includes, I will see what I can make of this. –  Jon Feb 29 '12 at 15:27
    
Have you ever test this? <beans default-lazy-init="false"> <import resource="applicationContext-core.xml"/> </beans> can not make beans eagerly init. –  pootow Apr 24 '13 at 5:50
1  
For my version of Spring, 3.1.2, setting default-lazy-init on the top level beans element does not apply to beans inside an imported resource. In this, I agree with pootow. Who knows whether it works under a different version of spring; it'd be lovely to. What I had to do was as Jon said. –  DanielKWinsor Aug 26 '13 at 0:05
1  
It works under Spring 3.2.3 (not checked for lesser version). However you must remove default-lazy-init/lazy-init attributes or set them to "default" to use "inheritance" (parent defaults). –  mlogan Apr 29 '14 at 9:56

I believe that the best way is to control lazy init of beans is to leave the default-lazy-init out of all config files except the topmost as Tomasz Nurkiewicz suggests. I did however in this case need a quick and dirty fix to verify all bean definitions. (It is a bit of a process to change the lazy init policy.)

I came up with a simple BeanFactoryPostProcessor which seems to do the job:

public class NonLazyInitBeanFactoryPostProcessor implements BeanFactoryPostProcessor {
    public void postProcessBeanFactory(ConfigurableListableBeanFactory beanFactory) throws BeansException {
        for (String beanName : beanFactory.getBeanDefinitionNames()) {
            beanFactory.getBeanDefinition(beanName).setLazyInit(false);
        }
    }
}

If included in a context file, it will override the lazy init flag set by any included context files.

<beans default-lazy-init="false">
    <bean class="example.NonLazyInitBeanFactoryPostProcessor" />
    <import resource="applicationContext-core.xml"/>
</beans>

If I try to create a context from the above xml, configuration errors previously hidden by lazy initialization will show up immediately as exceptions.

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There is one 'but' in this PostProcessor

for (String beanName : beanFactory.getBeanDefinitionNames()) {
        beanFactory.getBeanDefinition(beanName).setLazyInit(false);
    }

This for loop will iterate only over top most beans not including e.g internal(local) bean defintions ...

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