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I have these conditional css files

<!--[if IE 7]><link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="all" href="/Content/css/ie7.css" /><![endif]-->    
<!--[if IE 6]><link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="all" href="/Content/css/ie6.css" /><![endif]-->

How do I minify these as these should only be included for IE7 and IE6 respectively?

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1  
Forget about it. It's not worth spending time optimizing for IE6/7 in this way. –  thirtydot Feb 29 '12 at 13:50
    
Do you mean I should not bother to include these at all because a lot of people still use these browsers. –  Sachin Kainth Feb 29 '12 at 13:53
1  
No, I don't mean that. If you've already written CSS to fix IE6/7, then by all means keep it. What I meant was that it doesn't matter if IE6/7 have to load an extra stylesheet. –  thirtydot Feb 29 '12 at 13:55
    
In other words I should minify and combine these also? –  Sachin Kainth Feb 29 '12 at 14:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In other words I should minify and combine these also?

That's the opposite of what I'm saying.

There's no point spending time optimizing for dying web browsers.

What you already have works, and is good enough:

<!--[if IE 7]><link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="all" href="/Content/css/ie7.css" /><![endif]-->
<!--[if IE 6]><link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="all" href="/Content/css/ie6.css" /><![endif]-->

If you like, you can minify ie7.css and ie6.css to reduce the file size slightly, but these files should be relatively small already, being that they only contain a few fixes for IE6/7.

If you really want to get rid of these files, then you could include the fixes at the bottom of your main CSS file by using CSS hacks (valid hacks, in this case, so there's no risk of your minifier screwing them up).

For example, if you had this:

ie6.css:

.something {
    width: 100px;
}

ie7.css:

.something .else {
    float: left;
}

You could remove those files completely if you added this at the bottom of your main CSS file:

/* IE6 fixes */
* html .something {
    width: 100px;
}

/* IE7 fixes */
*+html .something .else {
    float: left;
}

More info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CSS_filter#Star_HTML_hack

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I wrote and use an OSS project called RequestReduce that automatically examines your outgoing response and looks for css and javascript to bundle and minify. This tool is used on several Microsoft owned properties and is gaining strong adoption in the community. It addresses this very issue just as thirtydot advises by leaving conditionally commented css and javascript alone. It really isn't worth the trouble to bundle these since the populations using those versions is small and shrinking every day. Those who are not using IE6 or 7 will not pull down these styles at all and are therefore unaffected. Its also particularly challenging to bundle them because you would have to emit a different bundle at runtime based on the visitor's user agent. While RequestReduce would be capable of doing that, there are more value added features I could be spending my time on.

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