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I'm writing a function that exponentiates an object, i.e. given a and n, returns an. Since a needs not be a built-in type, the function accepts, as a keyword argument, a function to perform multiplications. If undefined, it defaults to the objects __mul__ method, i.e. the object itself is expected to have multiplication defined. That part is sort of easy:

def bin_pow(a, n, **kwargs) :

    mul = kwargs.pop('mul',None)
    if mul is None :
        mul = lambda x,y : x*y

The thing is that in the process of calculating an the are a lot of intermediate squarings, and there often are more efficient ways to compute them than simply multiplying the object by itself. It is easy to define another function that computes the square and pass it as another keyword argument, something like:

def bin_pow(a, n, **kwargs) :
    mul = kwargs.pop('mul',None)
    sqr = kwargs.pop('sqr',None)

    if mul is None :
        mul = lambda x,y : x*y
    if sqr is None :
        sqr = lambda x : mul(x,x)

The problem here comes if the function to square the object is not a standalone function, but is a method of the object being exponentiated, which would be a very reasonable thing to do. The only way of doing this I can think of is something like this:

import inspect

def bin_pow(a, n, **kwargs) :
    mul = kwargs.pop('mul',None)
    sqr = kwargs.pop('sqr',None)

    if mul is None :
        mul = lambda x,y : x*y
    if sqr is None :
        sqr = lambda x : mul(x,x)
    elif inspect.isfunction(sqr) == False : # if not a function, it is a string
        sqr = lambda x : eval('x.'+sqr+'()')

It does work, but I find it an extremely unelegant way of doing things... My mastery of OOP is limited, but if there was a way to have sqr point to the class' function, not to an instance's one, then I could get away with something like sqr = lambda x : sqr(x), or maybe sqr = lambda x: x.sqr(). Can this be done? Is there any other more pythonic way?

share|improve this question
    
Well, maybe not the answer you want but you can use the built-in function hasattr to check if a method or property exists on an object. –  Skurmedel Jun 4 '09 at 12:08
    
Usage is hasattr(object, "propertyname"), e.g hasattr(1, "mul") to check if an object has a multiply operator. –  Skurmedel Jun 4 '09 at 12:09
    
"if inspect.isfunction(sqr) == False" should read "if not inspect.isfunction(sqr)" (that's prettier and also improves performance) –  balpha Jun 4 '09 at 12:09
3  
Why are you violating encapsulation on your numerical objects? Why not simply require each object to provide a suitable mul definition? All the built-in numeric types provide this? What's wrong with the built-in mul? –  S.Lott Jun 4 '09 at 12:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can call unbound methods with the instance as the first parameter:

class A(int):
    def sqr(self):
        return A(self*self)

sqr = A.sqr
a = A(5)
print sqr(a) # Prints 25

So in your case you don't actually need to do anything specific, just the following:

bin_pow(a, n, sqr=A.sqr)

Be aware that this is early binding, so if you have a subclass B that overrides sqr then still A.sqr is called. For late binding you can use a lambda at the callsite:

bin_pow(a, n, sqr=lambda x: x.sqr())
share|improve this answer
    
That's what I was after... The idea is to provide a library function, that can be used with the user's custom objects. so if he has overridden A.sqr with B.sqr, he should call the function with B.sqr... –  Jaime Jun 4 '09 at 16:31

here's how I'd do it:

import operator

def bin_pow(a, n, **kwargs) :
    pow_function = kwargs.pop('pow' ,None)

    if pow_function is None:
        pow_function = operator.pow

    return pow_function(a, n)

That's the fastest way. See also object.__pow__ and the operator module documentations.

Now, to pass an object method you can pass it directly, no need to pass a string with the name. In fact, never use strings for this kind of thing, using the object directly is much better.

If you want the unbound method, you can pass it just as well:

class MyClass(object):
    def mymethod(self, other):
        return do_something_with_self_and_other

m = MyClass()
n = MyClass()

bin_pow(m, n, pow=MyClass.mymethod)

If you want the class method, so just pass it instead:

class MyClass(object):
    @classmethod
    def mymethod(cls, x, y):
        return do_something_with_x_and_y

m = MyClass()
n = MyClass()

bin_pow(m, n, pow=MyClass.mymethod)
share|improve this answer
    
I thought of that, but the problem is that then pow is pointing to the pow function of m, i.e. it point to the function of an instance, not of the class. The object being squared will be one of the same type as m, but not m itself, and doing as you propose, the defined pow is taking m's self as the first argument by default. I just tried it: >>> a = TestClass(6) >>> a.sqr() 36 >>> b = TestClass(12) >>> b.sqr() 144 >>> func = a.sqr >>> func(b) Traceback (most recent call last): File "<pyshell#29>", line 1, in <module> func(b) TypeError: sqr() takes exactly 1 argument (2 given) –  Jaime Jun 4 '09 at 12:29
    
@Jaime added an example of using a class method. –  nosklo Jun 4 '09 at 13:03

If you want to call the class's method, and not the (possibly overridden) instance's method, you can do

instance.__class__.method(instance)

instead of

instance.method()

I'm not sure though if that's what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
That could work, although it would require a nasty user interface, but there may not be a better way around it... –  Jaime Jun 4 '09 at 12:34

If I understand the design goals of the library function, you want to provide a library "power" function which will raise any object passed to it to the Nth power. But you also want to provide a "shortcut" for efficiency.

The design goals seem a little odd--Python already defines the mul method to allow the designer of a class to multiply it by an arbitrary value, and the pow method to allow the designer of a class to support raising it to a power. If I were building this, I'd expect and require the users to have a mul method, and I'd do something like this:

def bin_or_pow(a, x):
    pow_func = getattr(a, '__pow__', None)
    if pow_func is None:
        def pow_func(n):
            v = 1
            for i in xrange(n):
                v = a * v

            return v

    return pow_func(x)

That will let you do the following:

class Multable(object):
    def __init__(self, x):
        self.x = x

    def __mul__(self, n):
        print 'in mul'
        n = getattr(n, 'x', n)
        return type(self)(self.x * n)

class Powable(Multable):
    def __pow__(self, n):
        print 'in pow'
        n = getattr(n, 'x', n)
        return type(self)(self.x ** n)

print bin_or_pow(5, 3)
print
print bin_or_pow(Multable(5), 5).x
print
print bin_or_pow(Powable(5), 5).x

... and you get ...

125

in mul
in mul
in mul
in mul
in mul
3125

in pow
3125

share|improve this answer

I understand it's the sqr-bit at the end you want to fix. If so, I suggest getattr. Example:

class SquarableThingy:
  def __init__(self, i):
    self.i = i
  def squarify(self):
    return self.i**2

class MultipliableThingy:
  def __init__(self, i):
    self.i = i
  def __mul__(self, other):
    return self.i * other.i

x = SquarableThingy(3)
y = MultipliableThingy(4)
z = 5
sqr = 'squarify'
sqrFunX = getattr(x, sqr, lambda: x*x)
sqrFunY = getattr(y, sqr, lambda: y*y)
sqrFunZ = getattr(z, sqr, lambda: z*z)
assert sqrFunX() == 9
assert sqrFunY() == 16
assert sqrFunZ() == 25
share|improve this answer
    
Please elaborate on downvote. –  Deestan Jun 4 '09 at 12:19

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