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I am building a simple WCF service that has to return some data from an SQL table. When i run the project i get the following error:

Failed to invoke the service. Possible causes: The service is offline or inaccessible; the client-side configuration does not match the proxy; the existing proxy is invalid. Refer to the stack trace for more detail. You can try to recover by starting a new proxy, restoring to default configuration, or refreshing the service

If i comment all the SQL part and send some static data everything is working fine. This is the function that is giving me headache :

public Client getClient(int idClient)
{
    Client c = new Client();
    SqlConnection sql = new SqlConnection(@"Data Source=GRIGORE\SQLEXPRESS;Initial Catalog=testWCF;Integrated Security=True");
    sql.Open();

    SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("Select * from Clienti where id = " + idClient);
    SqlDataReader dr = cmd.ExecuteReader();
    if (dr.Read())
    {
        c.idClient = int.Parse(dr["id"].ToString());
        c.numeClient = dr["nume"].ToString();
    }

    dr.Close();
    sql.Close();

    return c;
}

Ideas ?

share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried debugging that method? – jrummell Feb 29 '12 at 14:11
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're not setting the Connection property of your SqlCommand instance. You need to do this:

    SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("Select * from Clienti where id = " + idClient);
    cmd.Connection = sql;  // added Connection property initialization
    SqlDataReader dr = cmd.ExecuteReader();

Or you can just inject this into your constructor:

    SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("...your query text", sql);
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot. that was my problem. i will accept you answer as soon as i can do that :-d – rhose87 Feb 29 '12 at 14:19
    
@rhose87 No problem, glad to help. :) – user596075 Feb 29 '12 at 14:20

Actually, your code should be more like this:

public Client getClient(int idClient)
{
    var c = new Client();
    using (var sql = new SqlConnection(@"Data Source=GRIGORE\SQLEXPRESS;Initial Catalog=testWCF;Integrated Security=True"))
    {
        sql.Open();

        using (var cmd = new SqlCommand("Select * from Clienti where id = " + idClient, sql))
        {
            using (SqlDataReader dr = cmd.ExecuteReader())
            {
                if (dr.Read())
                {
                    c.idClient = int.Parse(dr["id"].ToString());
                    c.numeClient = dr["nume"].ToString();
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return c;
}

By placing the connection, command and reader in using blocks, you ensure that they are disposed of, even if an exception is thrown. You also don't need the explicit Close calls in this case, as disposing of the objects takes care of that for you.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your answer. i was just trying to make it work. i will use your method when i want it to be secure and well done :-D – rhose87 Feb 29 '12 at 19:11
    
Actually, I recommend you get in the habit of using using blocks for every object you create that implements IDisposable (except for WCF proxy objects). In my experience, "demo" code winds up getting into production fairly often, so "demo" code should not have the more obvious and dangerous bugs in it. – John Saunders Feb 29 '12 at 19:51
    
thanks for the advice. i will try to follow it. – rhose87 Mar 1 '12 at 6:14

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