Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Are there non obvious differences between NVL and Coalesce in Oracle?

The obvious differences are that coalesce will return the first non null item in its parameter list whereas nvl only takes two parameters and returns the first if it is not null, otherwise it returns the second.

It seems that NVL may just be a 'Base Case" version of coalesce.

Am I missing something?

share|improve this question
up vote 210 down vote accepted

COALESCE is more modern function that is a part of ANSI-92 standard.

NVL is Oracle specific, it was introduced in 80's before there were any standards.

In case of two values, they are synonyms.

However, they are implemented differently.

NVL always evaluates both arguments, while COALESCE stops evaluation whenever it finds first non-NULL:

SELECT  SUM(val)
FROM    (
        SELECT  NVL(1, LENGTH(RAWTOHEX(SYS_GUID()))) AS val
        FROM    dual
        CONNECT BY
                level <= 10000
        )

This runs for almost 0.5 seconds, since it generates SYS_GUID()'s, despite 1 being not a NULL.

SELECT  SUM(val)
FROM    (
        SELECT  COALESCE(1, LENGTH(RAWTOHEX(SYS_GUID()))) AS val
        FROM    dual
        CONNECT BY
                level <= 10000
        )

This understands that 1 is not a NULL and does not evaluate the second argument.

SYS_GUID's are not generated and the query is instant.

share|improve this answer
2  
Awesome, thanks. I was guessing there was some kind of trick. – Tom Hubbard Jun 4 '09 at 12:26
2  
They are not exactly synonyms... At least you can find a difference in the fact that NVL makes an implicit data type casting if the given values are of different types. So for instance, I was getting an error using COALESCE passing it two NULL values (one explicitly set and the other taken from a column in the database, of type NUMBER), that just disappear by changing the function to NVL. – DanielM Mar 3 '15 at 9:20

NVL will do an implicit conversion to the datatype of the first parameter, so the following does not error

select nvl('a',sysdate) from dual;

COALESCE expects consistent datatypes.

select coalesce('a',sysdate) from dual;

will throw a 'inconsistent datatype error'

share|improve this answer

There is also difference is in plan handling.

Oracle is able form an optimized plan with concatenation of branch filters when search contains comparison of nvl result with an indexed column.

create table tt(a, b) as
select level, mod(level,10)
from dual
connect by level<=1e4;

alter table tt add constraint ix_tt_a primary key(a);
create index ix_tt_b on tt(b);

explain plan for
select * from tt
where a=nvl(:1,a)
  and b=:2;

explain plan for
select * from tt
where a=coalesce(:1,a)
  and b=:2;

nvl:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                     | Name    | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT              |         |     2 |    52 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  CONCATENATION                |         |       |       |            |          |
|*  2 |   FILTER                      |         |       |       |            |          |
|*  3 |    TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| TT      |     1 |    26 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  4 |     INDEX RANGE SCAN          | IX_TT_B |     7 |       |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  5 |   FILTER                      |         |       |       |            |          |
|*  6 |    TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| TT      |     1 |    26 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  7 |     INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | IX_TT_A |     1 |       |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   2 - filter(:1 IS NULL)
   3 - filter("A" IS NOT NULL)
   4 - access("B"=TO_NUMBER(:2))
   5 - filter(:1 IS NOT NULL)
   6 - filter("B"=TO_NUMBER(:2))
   7 - access("A"=:1)

coalesce:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                   | Name    | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT            |         |     1 |    26 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  1 |  TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| TT      |     1 |    26 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  2 |   INDEX RANGE SCAN          | IX_TT_B |    40 |       |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   1 - filter("A"=COALESCE(:1,"A"))
   2 - access("B"=TO_NUMBER(:2))

Credits go to http://www.xt-r.com/2012/03/nvl-coalesce-concatenation.html.

share|improve this answer

Though this one is obvious, and even mentioned in a way put up by Tom who asked this question. But lets put up again.

NVL can have only 2 arguments. Coalesce may have more than 2.

select nvl('','',1) from dual; //Result: ORA-00909: invalid number of arguments
select coalesce('','','1') from dual; //Output: returns 1

share|improve this answer

NVL and COALESCE are used to achieve the same functionality of providing a default value in case the column returns a NULL.

The differences are:

  1. NVL accepts only 2 arguments whereas COALESCE can take multiple arguments
  2. NVL evaluates both the arguments and COALESCE stops at first occurrence of a non-Null value.
  3. NVL does a implicit datatype conversion based on the first argument given to it. COALESCE expects all arguments to be of same datatype.
  4. COALESCE gives issues in queries which use UNION clauses. Example below
  5. COALESCE is ANSI standard where as NVL is Oracle specific.

Examples for the third case. Other cases are simple.

select nvl('abc',10) from dual; would work as NVL will do an implicit conversion of numeric 10 to string.

select coalesce('abc',10) from dual; will fail with Error - inconsistent datatypes: expected CHAR got NUMBER

Example for UNION use-case

SELECT COALESCE(a, sysdate) 
from (select null as a from dual 
      union 
      select null as a from dual
      );

fails with ORA-00932: inconsistent datatypes: expected CHAR got DATE

SELECT NVL(a, sysdate) 
from (select null as a from dual 
      union 
      select null as a from dual
      ) ;

succeeds.

More information : http://www.oracleinformation.com/2016/01/difference-between-nvl-and-coalesce.html

share|improve this answer

NVL: Replace the null with value.

COALESCE: Return the first non-null expression from expression list.

Table: PRICE_LIST

+----------------+-----------+
| Purchase_Price | Min_Price |
+----------------+-----------+
| 10             | null      |
| 20             |           |
| 50             | 30        |
| 100            | 80        |
| null           | null      |
+----------------+-----------+   

Below is the example of

[1] Set sales price with adding 10% profit to all products.
[2] If there is no purchase list price, then the sale price is the minimum price. For clearance sale.
[3] If there is no minimum price also, then set the sale price as default price "50".

SELECT
     Purchase_Price,
     Min_Price,
     NVL(Purchase_Price + (Purchase_Price * 0.10), Min_Price)    AS NVL_Sales_Price,
COALESCE(Purchase_Price + (Purchase_Price * 0.10), Min_Price,50) AS Coalesce_Sales_Price
FROM 
Price_List

Explain with real life practical example.

+----------------+-----------+-----------------+----------------------+
| Purchase_Price | Min_Price | NVL_Sales_Price | Coalesce_Sales_Price |
+----------------+-----------+-----------------+----------------------+
| 10             | null      | 11              |                   11 |
| null           | 20        | 20              |                   20 |
| 50             | 30        | 55              |                   55 |
| 100            | 80        | 110             |                  110 |
| null           | null      | null            |                   50 |
+----------------+-----------+-----------------+----------------------+

You can see that with NVL we can achieve rules [1],[2]
But with COALSECE we can achieve all three rules.

share|improve this answer
    
what you say about NVL(Purchase_Price + (Purchase_Price * 0.10), nvl(Min_Price,50)) . Or about: nvl(NVL(Purchase_Price + (Purchase_Price * 0.10), Min_Price) ,50) :) – Florin Ghita Jan 29 at 11:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.