Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have 3 tables t1, t2, t3. I want a result set based on these conditions : t1 with outer join on t2 (all rows of t1), t1 with outer join on t3 (all rows of t1) and t2 with outer join on t3 (all rows of t2). How to use these outer 3 joins in a single query? Basically I want to convert a t-sql format query to ANSI format. The original query is something like this

Select * from t1, t2, t3
where t1.col1 *= t2.col1
  and t1.col2 *= t3.col1
  and t2.col2 *= t3.col2

I managed to use first 2 joins as

   Select * 
     from t1
left join t2 on t1.col1 = t2.col1
left join t3 on t1.col2 = t3.col1

This works properly for first 2 conditions. But wasn't able to incorporate the 3rd join. Can anyone please suggest a way to accompolish this? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
I tried to test your original query in SQL Server 2000 but I get an error, "Query contains an outer-join request that is not permitted." Therefore, I think @ypercube 's answer is the 'correct' one i.e. you've posed an problem that is not clearly defined enough to be able to provide a solution. – onedaywhen Mar 1 '12 at 9:19
    
Actually its just a part of a bigger query which i was trying to rewrite. I was just trying to match the results of the original and that's where i got stuck on this part. Tobsey's solution got me ahead with the problem at hand. But ypercube's post makes sense and the insisghts will be helpful for me when i'm writing my own queries :) – SFK Mar 2 '12 at 7:23
    
OK but proceed with caution. I'd feel more reassured if you had taken the time to fix your simple example but good luck :) – onedaywhen Mar 2 '12 at 11:29
up vote 3 down vote accepted

From your question I guess you only want rows from t3 that join with the rows from t2 that joined with t1:

SELECT 
    * 
FROM
    t1
    LEFT JOIN t2 ON t1.col1 = t2.col1
    LEFT JOIN t3 ON t1.col2 = t3.col1 AND t2.col2 = t3.col2

This will not include rows from t2 and t3 that join on col2, unless the rows from t2 have already joined with t1 on col1.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks @Tobsey this works. I had tried this but had put the last 2 conditions inside brackets which wasn't correct i guess. This is giving me the correct resultset. – SFK Mar 1 '12 at 6:13

You can have several variations, all with different result sets. Which of them was the original intention is difficult if not impossible for others to tell:


(Variation 1 - Tobsey's query, join first to t2, then to t3, equivalent to):

SELECT 
    * 
FROM
        t1
    INNER JOIN                                --- or LEFT JOIN
        t2 
            ON  t1.col1 = t2.col1
    LEFT JOIN 
        t3 
            ON  t1.col2 = t3.col1 
            AND t2.col2 = t3.col2     --- this line makes the first LEFT join
                                      --- equal to INNER join

(Variation 2 - join first to t3, then to t2 ):

SELECT 
    * 
FROM
        t1
    INNER JOIN                                --- or LEFT JOIN
        t3 
            ON  t1.col2 = t3.col1 
    LEFT JOIN 
        t2 
            ON  t1.col1 = t2.col1  
            AND t3.col2 = t2.col2 

(Variation 3a - join first t2 to t3, then join t1 to that join ):

SELECT 
    * 
FROM
        t1
    LEFT JOIN
            t2 
        LEFT JOIN 
            t3 
                ON  t2.col2 = t3.col2  
        ON  t1.col1 = t2.col1
        AND t1.col2 = t3.col1 

Variation 3 can have several more sub-variations if you replace the first or the second LEFT join with an INNER join.

My guess is you want variation 3a.

share|improve this answer
    
Tobsey's ans worked for me. Thanks @ypercube for the insight. I will thoroughly try all your approaches and keep these in mind. – SFK Mar 1 '12 at 6:16
    
+1 You was robbed! – onedaywhen Mar 1 '12 at 9:20
3  
@onedaywhen: this question/example is a very good illustration why the *= way of doing outer joins leads to ambiguity. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Mar 1 '12 at 9:24
1  
@ypercube and in fact the =* syntax is no longer valid in SQl server 2008 and was, as illustrated, seriously broken even in SQL Server 2000. Anyone who has any of this code in their code base should immediately replace it. It doesn't work correctly now and it won't work at all when you upgrade (unless you stay in SQL Server 2000 compatibility mode). – HLGEM Mar 5 '12 at 16:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.