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I return a List from a Linq query, and after it I have to fill the values in it with a for cycle. The problem is that it is too slow.

var formentries = (from f in db.bNetFormEntries
            join s in db.bNetFormStatus on f.StatusID.Value equals s.StatusID into entryStatus
            join s2 in db.bNetFormStatus on f.ExternalStatusID.Value equals s2.StatusID into entryStatus2
            where f.FormID == formID
            orderby f.FormEntryID descending
            select new FormEntry
            {
                FormEntryID = f.FormEntryID,
                FormID = f.FormID,
                IPAddress = f.IpAddress,
                UserAgent = f.UserAgent,
                CreatedBy = f.CreatedBy,
                CreatedDate = f.CreatedDate,
                UpdatedBy = f.UpdatedBy,
                UpdatedDate = f.UpdatedDate,
                StatusID = f.StatusID,
                StatusText = entryStatus.FirstOrDefault().Status,
                ExternalStatusID = f.ExternalStatusID,
                ExternalStatusText = entryStatus2.FirstOrDefault().Status
            }).ToList();

and then I use the for in this way:

for(var x=0; x<formentries.Count(); x++)
{
    var values = (from e in entryvalues
                where e.FormEntryID.Equals(formentries.ElementAt(x).FormEntryID)
                select e).ToList<FormEntryValue>();
    formentries.ElementAt(x).Values = values;
}
return formentries.ToDictionary(entry => entry.FormEntryID, entry => entry);

But it is definitely too slow. Is there a way to make it faster?

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2  
Each call to formentries.Count and formentries.ElementAt will execute the underlying query again. You should cache the query result and operate over that by calling either ToArray or ToList on formentries (and saving the result) prior to performing your logic over formentries –  Polity Feb 29 '12 at 15:06
1  
@Polity the query it's already materialized –  Adrian Iftode Feb 29 '12 at 15:13
1  
It is true that since it is a list, it won't run the query again, but it should be noted that .Count() is an extension method, and is not as fast as the List's .Count property. –  davisoa Feb 29 '12 at 15:22
2  
@davisoa, the difference will be negligible. ElementAt() is optimized for IList<T>. –  svick Feb 29 '12 at 15:24
2  
What is entryvalues? Is that a database query? What exactly do you mean that it's “too slow”? How do you measure it? How many items do you have? –  svick Feb 29 '12 at 15:27
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For what I see, you are iterating trough formentries 2 more times without reason - when you populate the values, and when you convert to dictionary.

If entryvalues is a database driven - i.e. you get them from the database, then put the value field population in the first query.

If it's not, then you do not need to invoke ToList() on the first query, do the loop, and then the Dictionary creation.

var formentries = from f in db.bNetFormEntries
                join s in db.bNetFormStatus on f.StatusID.Value equals s.StatusID into entryStatus
                join s2 in db.bNetFormStatus on f.ExternalStatusID.Value equals s2.StatusID into entryStatus2
                where f.FormID == formID
                orderby f.FormEntryID descending
                select new FormEntry
                {
                    FormEntryID = f.FormEntryID,
                    FormID = f.FormID,
                    IPAddress = f.IpAddress,
                    UserAgent = f.UserAgent,
                    CreatedBy = f.CreatedBy,
                    CreatedDate = f.CreatedDate,
                    UpdatedBy = f.UpdatedBy,
                    UpdatedDate = f.UpdatedDate,
                    StatusID = f.StatusID,
                    StatusText = entryStatus.FirstOrDefault().Status,
                    ExternalStatusID = f.ExternalStatusID,
                    ExternalStatusText = entryStatus2.FirstOrDefault().Status
                };

var formEntryDictionary = new Dictionary<int, FormEntry>();

foreach (formEntry in formentries)
{
    formentry.Values = GetValuesForFormEntry(formentry, entryvalues);
    formEntryDict.Add(formEntry.FormEntryID, formEntry);
}

return formEntryDictionary;

And the values preparation:

private IList<FormEntryValue> GetValuesForFormEntry(FormEntry formEntry, IEnumerable<FormEntryValue> entryValues)
{
    return (from e in entryValues
                    where e.FormEntryID.Equals(formEntry.FormEntryID)
                    select e).ToList<FormEntryValue>();
}

You can change the private method to accept only entryId instead the whole formEntry if you wish.

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There are some reasons why this might be slow regarding the way you use formentries.

  • The formentries List<T> from above has a Count property, but you are calling the enumerable Count() extension method instead. This extension may or may not have an optimization that detects that you're operating on a collection type that has a Count property that it can defer to instead of walking the enumeration to compute the count.
  • Similarly the formEntries.ElementAt(x) expression is used twice; if they have not optimized ElementAt to determine that they are working with a collection like a list that can jump to an item by its index then LINQ will have to redundantly walk the list to get to the xth item.

The above evaluation may miss the real problem, which you'll only really know if you profile. However, you can avoid the above while making your code significantly easier to read if you switch how you iterate the collection of formentries as follows:

foreach(var fe in formentries)
{
    fe.Values = entryvalues
        .Where(e => e.FormEntryID.Equals(fe.FormEntryID))
        .ToList<FormEntryValue>();
}
return formentries.ToDictionary(entry => entry.FormEntryID, entry => entry);

You may have resorted to the for(var x=...) ...ElementAt(x) approach because you thought you could not modify properties on object referenced by the foreach loop variable fe.

That said, another point that could be an issue is if formentries has multiple items with the same FormEntryID. This would result in the same work being done multiple times inside the loop. While the top query appears to be against a database, you can still do joins with data in linq-to-object land. Happy optimizing/profiling/coding - let us know what works for you.

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It's slow because your O(N*M) where N is formentries.Count and M is entryvalues.Count Even with a simple test I was getting more than 20 times slower with only 1000 elements any my type only had an int id field, with 10000 elements in the list it was over 1600 times slower than the code below!

Assuming your entryvalues is a local list and not hitting a database (just .ToList() it to a new variable somewhere if that's the case), and assuming your FormEntryId is unique (which it seems to be from the .ToDictionary call then try this instead:

var entryvaluesDictionary = entryvalues.ToDictionary(entry => entry.FormEntryID, entry => entry);
for(var x=0; x<formentries.Count; x++)
{
    formentries[x] = entryvaluesDictionary[formentries[x].FormEntryID];
}
return formentries.ToDictionary(entry => entry.FormEntryID, entry => entry);

It should go a long way to making it at least scale better.

Changes: .Count instead of .Count() just because it's better to not call extension method when you don't need to. Using a dictionary to find the values rather than doing a where for every x value in the for loop effectively removes the M from the bigO.

If this isn't entirely correct I'm sure you can change whatever is missing to suit your work case instead. But as an aside, you should really consider using case for your variable names formentries versus formEntries one is just that little bit easier to read.

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it is definitely too slow. Is there a way to make it faster?

Maybe. Maybe not. But that's not the right question to ask. The right question is:

Why is it so slow?

It is a lot easier to figure out the answer to the first question if you have an answer to the second question! If the answer to the second question is "because the database is in Tokyo and I'm in Rome, and the fact that the packets move no faster than speed of light is the cause of my unacceptable slowdown", then the way you make it faster is you move to Japan; no amount of fixing the query is going to change the speed of light.

To figure out why it is so slow, get a profiler. Run the code through the profiler and use that to identify where you are spending most of your time. Then see if you can speed up that part.

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