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Consider the following example (I am using Delphi XE):

program Test;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

type
  TTestClass<T> = class
  private
    class constructor CreateClass();
  public
    constructor Create();
  end;

class constructor TTestClass<T>.CreateClass();
begin
  // class constructor is not called. this line never gets executed!
  Writeln('class created');
end;

constructor TTestClass<T>.Create();
begin
  // this line, of course, is printed
  Writeln('instance created');
end;

var
  test: TTestClass<Integer>;

begin
  test := TTestClass<Integer>.Create();
  test.Free();
end.

The class constructur is never called and hence the line 'class created' is not printed. However, if I remove the generalisation and make TTestClass<T> into a standard class TTestClass, everything works as expected.

Am I missing something out with generics? Or it simply doesn't work?

Any thoughts on this would be apprechiated!

Thanks, --Stefan--

share|improve this question
    
The documentation states: "Note: The class constructor for a generic class or record may execute multiple times. The exact number of times the class constructor is executed in this case depends on the number of specialized versions of the generic type. For example, the class constructor for a specialized TList<String> class may execute multiple times in the same application." But it looks a bit like a bug then. –  David Heffernan Feb 29 '12 at 15:14
    
Yes. I read that, too. Unless "multiple times" includes zero times, this really does look like a bug. –  Schafsmann Feb 29 '12 at 15:16
    
General rule: Don't try to make a self contained .dpr application. Always have at least one unit, and keep everything out of DPR files that you can keep out of it. –  Warren P Feb 29 '12 at 17:12
2  
@WarrenP - I think it's pretty clear that this was a self-contained example for the purposes of making the question easier to deal with. A fortunate coincidence that it (accidentally) preserved the conditions under which the error manifested. What's really worrying is that the generics implementation in Delphi is still so fragile as to suffer from bizarre bugs like this. –  Deltics Feb 29 '12 at 20:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Looks like a compiler bug. The same code works if you move the TTestClass declaration and implementation to a separate unit.

unit TestClass;

interface
type
  TTestClass<T> = class
  private
    class constructor CreateClass();
  public
    constructor Create();
  end;

var
  test: TTestClass<Integer>;

implementation

class constructor TTestClass<T>.CreateClass();
begin
  Writeln('class created');
end;

constructor TTestClass<T>.Create();
begin
  Writeln('instance created');
end;

end.
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 I have reached the exact same conclusion myself! –  David Heffernan Feb 29 '12 at 15:19
1  
Great, thanks for solving this! I'd +1, too if I could. Actually I had my class in it's own unit but I used it in the .dpr file only. So the answer to the question is: Class constructors of generic classes don't run for objects instantiated in the .dpr file. –  Schafsmann Feb 29 '12 at 15:41
    
and I already did :) –  Schafsmann Feb 29 '12 at 15:46
    
Further vindication of my resolve to avoid generics like the proverbial plague. That they still suffer from such bizarre bugs as this after this many iterations and evolutions in the compiler is truly depressing and worrying. –  Deltics Feb 29 '12 at 20:12

I can confirm that this is a bug. If the only instantiation of the class is in the .dpr file, then the class constructor does not run. If you create another unit, i.e. a separate .pas file, and instantiate a TTestClass<Integer> from there, then your class constructor will run.

I have submitted QC#103798.

share|improve this answer
1  
Still not fixed in XE5. The worst thing is that you have to declare or instantiate a variable in the separate .pas file. And you have to do that for every T used in your program!! –  LU RD Feb 13 at 19:17

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