Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this setup:

class DontUse;

template<class T,class U = DontUse, class V = SomeStandardType>
class Foo
{
   public:
     void bar(U &uh);
};

When U is set to DontUse, I want bar to be an empty function. In all other cases, I want bar to have some implementation. I tried doing this using specialization, but this code (which I realize is somehow incorrect) doesn't compile:

template<class T,class V> void Foo<T,DontUse,V>::bar(DontUse &none){}
template<class T,class U,class V> void Foo<T,U,V>::bar(U &uh)
{
  //do something here
}

The error message is this (MSVC10):

1>path_to_project: error C2244: 'Foo<T,U,V>::bar' : unable to match function definition to an existing declaration

and it points to the line of the first template specialization.

How do I do this correctly?

Here's the actual code, although it's reduced to the minimalist part that's relevant:

    struct DontUse;

    template<typename Derived, typename Renderer =  DontUse, typename TimeType = long>
    class Gamestate
    {
    public:

        void Render(Renderer &r);

    };

    template<typename Derived, typename TimeType> void Gamestate<Derived, DontUse,TimeType>::Render( DontUse){}
    template<typename Derived, typename Renderer, typename TimeType> void Gamestate<Derived,Renderer,TimeType>::Render(Renderer &r)
    {
        static_cast<Derived*>(this)->Render(r);
    }
share|improve this question
    
can you post the definition of your specialized class? –  Nate Feb 29 '12 at 15:52
    
@Nate: Yep, I put it in the question. –  TravisG Feb 29 '12 at 16:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You cannot specialize individual members of a template. You have to specialize the class itself:

class DontUse;

template<class T, class V>
class Foo<T, DontUse, V>
{
   public:
     void bar(DontUse)
     { }
};
share|improve this answer

I recommend to just use this:

#include <type_traits>

template <class A, class B, class C>
struct S
{
    void foo(B& b)
    {
        static_assert(!std::is_same<U, DontUse>::value, "Bad Boy!");
    }
};

Or, if you really want a empty function, just use an if.

#include <type_traits>

template <class A, class B, class C>
struct S
{
    void foo(B& b)
    {
         if(!std::is_same<U, DontUse>::value)
         {
              //all code goes here
         }
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but doing it like that is not sufficient. The point is to make it possible for the user to instantiate a Derived<Gamestate> that doesn't actually do any rendering (For example for serverside programming). I could just have the user leave that function implemented but empty, but doing it my way would be a little more comfortable, I think. By the way, I'll acceppt Bo Persson's answer, since technically he answered my question more precisely (how to specialize the thing) and gave code. –  TravisG Feb 29 '12 at 16:14
    
@heishe With is_same you're able to do anything you want. Throw exception, call another function, etc. I don't see you're problem here. –  cooky451 Feb 29 '12 at 16:30
    
Yes, I see what you mean now. Just do void Render(Renderer &r) { if(is_same<...>::value) { do nothing } else {do default stuff}}. Still, I asked a follow-up question to this question over here, which asks if this is somehow possible at compile-time: stackoverflow.com/questions/9503042/… –  TravisG Feb 29 '12 at 16:45
    
I don't think your solution would work after all, since in "do default stuff" I would have to use functions of the given template type, which DontUse obviously doesn't possess (which leads to a compile error). –  TravisG Feb 29 '12 at 16:47
    
I still don't get your problem, but the answer on the other question seems to be the best you can get, so go with that. I didn't even know myself that that is possible. ;) –  cooky451 Feb 29 '12 at 17:02

It doesn't work like that. A member function of a class template is not itself a separate template, and cannot be specialized (partially or fully) independently of the class template.

You need to define a partial specialization of the class template Foo, give it a bar member function, and define that.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.