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class MyClass(functions: Seq[Function1[Array[_], Unit]) {
  def foo(parametersForEachFunction: Seq[Array[_]]) {
    assert(functions.size == parametersForEachFunction.size)
    for ((function, parameter) <- functions zip parametersForEachFunction) {
      // Assume each parameter is suitable for the funcition
      // What type parameter I should wrote in asInstanceOf?
      function(parameter.asInstanceOf[ ?????? ])
    }
  }
}

I know an asInstanceOf is required here, but I don't know what type parameter I should wrote in asInstanceOf.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you have to cast, you are doing it wrong. Whenever you think you should cast something, rollback and try something else. There are exceptions -- if the documentation of something explicitly tell you to cast, well, you have to cast. But don't count on you have such an exception: you probably don't.

As in this case.

scala> class MyClass(functions: Seq[Function1[Array[_], Unit]]) {
     |   def foo(parametersForEachFunction: Seq[Array[_]]) {
     |     assert(functions.size == parametersForEachFunction.size)
     |     for ((function, parameter) <- functions zip parametersForEachFunction) {
     |       function(parameter)
     |     }
     |   }
     | }
defined class MyClass
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Function0 takes only one type param, so not sure what you're doing.

If you're thinking about passing arbitrary argument to arbitrary arity of functions, you probably could look into Function2 etc's curried method or Function object's tupled. I vaguely recall scalaz being able to do this kind of stuff out of the box, but not sure.

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No, arity-stuff is the realm of shapeless. –  Daniel C. Sobral Feb 29 '12 at 16:57

You probably want Function1, since you want to pass one parameter. Function0, as the name implies, takes zero parameters. I prefer using A => B to Function1[A,B], so I'll write it that way. (Note that all functions have one return value.)

class MyClass(fns: Seq[Array[_] => Unit]) {
  def foo(parms: Seq[Array[_]]) {
    for ((f,p) <- fns zip parms) {
      f(p)
    }
  }
}

Also, Array and only Array is non-generic. You can't pass an Array[Int] or an Array[String] in for an Array[_]. So the above probably doesn't do what you want:

scala> new MyClass(Seq((a: Array[_]) => println(a.length)))
res0: MyClass = MyClass@3fee3c8d

scala> new MyClass(Seq((a: Array[String]) => println(a.mkString)))
<console>:9: error: type mismatch;
 found   : Array[String] => Unit
 required: Array[_] => Unit
              new MyClass(Seq((a: Array[String]) => println(a.mkString)))

scala> new MyClass(Seq(((a: Array[String]) => println(a.mkString)).asInstanceOf[Array[_]=>Unit]))
res4: MyClass = MyClass@4b9cee52

scala> new MyClass(Seq(((a: Array[Int]) => println(a.sum)).asInstanceOf[Array[_]=>Unit]))
res5: MyClass = MyClass@2357f593

scala> res5.foo(Seq(Array(1,2,3).asInstanceOf[Array[_]]))
6

Ugh! Maybe you can find another way to represent what you want? (Since I don't know your use case, I hesitate to recommend anything.)

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