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I have a form at the moment I'd like to validate, and assuming everything is correct, I'd like it to then popup a dialog confirming their details, here's an example of the code I have so far:

var userConfirmed = false;

$("#dialog").dialog({
    buttons: {
        "Yes": function() {
            userConfirmed = true;
            $("#inputform").submit();
        },
        "No, I'll change them.": function() {
            $(this).dialog("close");
        }
    }
});

// check they've submitted what they need to
$("form").submit(function() {

    // lots of these
    if (something) {
        return false;
    }

    $("#dialog").dialog("open");

    return userConfirmed;

});

The initial validation works fine - it checks against the criteria and flags up as appropiate, and if none of that criteria is met, it'll display the modal box just as I want. So far, so good.

The problem however is when I press 'yes' to submit the form, it doesn't submit, until you press the actual 'submit' button again, argh! Any call to submit the forum using jQuery fails.

Any suggestions would be very welcome, thank you.

share|improve this question
    
I've tried stripping back all of my code apart from this - pastebin.com/iUARx8CM - still no joy... – xn dx Feb 29 '12 at 18:19
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Add a flag somewhere telling whether or not the dialog already appeared, and the user clicked yes. Example:

var userConfirmed = false;
$("form").submit(function(e) {
    if ( userConfirmed ) {
        userConfirmed = false; // Reset it to false
        return true; // No need to validate anything, that was already done last time
    }
    var form = $(this);
    // ...
        "Yes": function() {
            userConfirmed = true; // Confirm that the dialog was shown and the user clicked "Yes"
            $(this).dialog("close");
            form.submit(); // Try again; this time, the validation was already done
        },
    // ...
    return false; // Don't submit; the user haven't confirmed the info on the dialog
});

Without that flag, you'd be in a chicken-and-egg situation: the submit opens the dialog, and the dialog calling $("form").submit() opens the dialog again...

If you have many forms and don't want to use a "global" var, you can use data for the same purpose.

Update: live example at jsFiddle. Tested with success in Chrome and Firefox (it will display a blank page 3 seconds after submitting).

share|improve this answer
    
This is a good idea, thank you. My main concern is if the dialog is presented to the user and they edit their data, it then wouldn't appear again with a final prompt before they submit. I know that sounds like sucky design, but it's a requirement unfortunately :$ – xn dx Feb 29 '12 at 16:22
    
Damn, ignore me - sorry I only just realised your dialogAppeared flag is set only when the user clicks yes. :-) – xn dx Feb 29 '12 at 16:23
    
You mean, if the user chose "Cancel"? That way, dialogAppeared wouldn't be set to true (note that only the "Yes" button sets it). Maybe I should have used a better name for that var... [done] – mgibsonbr Feb 29 '12 at 16:25
1  
That's weird... Unfortunatly I can't help you with that. But the updated answer from remibreton+PCasagrande looks promising, I'd say even cleaner than mine, you could try that instead – mgibsonbr Feb 29 '12 at 16:43
1  
Added a live example at jsFiddle and it worked fine. My bet is that some exception were thrown in your "Yes" button that you didn't notice, that's why it only worked after clicking the button again (the variable was still true at that point) – mgibsonbr Feb 29 '12 at 17:06

as always I recommend the use jQuery validate for validation then code would look like this

$("#formid").validate({
    submitHandler: function(form) {
               $("#dialog").dialog({
     buttons: {
         "Ok": function() {
             form.submit();
             $(this).dialog("close");
         },
         "Cancel": function() {
             $(this).dialog("close");
         }
     }
});
    }
});

LIVE DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks, I wanted to avoid an external plugin if possible but looks like I should probably check this one out – xn dx Feb 29 '12 at 16:53
    
it is worth noting that this plugin was build by a member of the jQuery team and is widely used to validate forms and will save you tons of time writing code – mcgrailm Feb 29 '12 at 16:54
    
Many thanks, I think this is probably my best option :) – xn dx Feb 29 '12 at 17:05
    
Just tried to implement this, it's very good (thank you) but it's massively inconsistent with the way errors are generated across the site at present (using jGrowl calls and focusing on the element with the error) and as a result would take a ridiculously large amount of time to implement :( Thank you though, it's a good suggestion. – xn dx Feb 29 '12 at 17:38

The fact that the dialog opens does not stop the execution of the code. valToReturn is returned by $("form").submit() before it's even set.

You could do something like this:

//Save the default behavior to break any loops
var defaultSubmit = $.extend(true, {}, $("form").submit);

$("form").submit(function(e) {

    var valToReturn = true;

    // lots of these
    if (something) {
        return false;
    }

    // popup the dialog confirmation
    $("#dialog").dialog({
        buttons: {
            "Ok": function() {
                $(this).dialog("close");
                defaultSubmit(); // User confirmed, submit form.
            },
            "Cancel": function() {
                $(this).dialog("close"); // Form already prevented from submitting. Exit quietly.
            }
        }
    });

    $("#dialog").dialog("open");

    return false; // Prevent form from being submitted

});
share|improve this answer
    
Check out my updated answer. – Rémi Breton Feb 29 '12 at 16:16
    
Ah! Thank you for the update :) This is a nice idea, I tried it just before posting but unfortunately it causes an infinite loop of constantly trying to call the form.submit function – xn dx Feb 29 '12 at 16:18
    
Try saving the existing $("form").submit() into a variable and then change the functionality with jQuery. In your OK function you could just then call the saved version and the form would process properly. – PCasagrande Feb 29 '12 at 16:23
    
Thanks for the update, unfortunately it still results in an infinite loop – xn dx Feb 29 '12 at 16:50
    
I like the general idea of saving the last handler, but will this code really do it? From what I could read, it will save $.fn.submit in a var, then call it without any this, I don't think that would work at all. Even if you used $.proxy to bind it to the right element, it would still be the same function, so the custom handler would be called again. – mgibsonbr Feb 29 '12 at 16:51

I would attach the event to a button instead of the form. Just attach it to a submit button click. Then you can use event.preventDefault() to keep the form from submitting until the dialogue has been confirmed. In the 'Yes' function just put $('form').submit(). No need to worry about the return value that way either.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I did consider this, but it'd make it awkward when a user submits a form simply by hitting the enter key. – xn dx Feb 29 '12 at 16:21

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