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Can somebody point me to documentation on hard and soft limits of number of threads J9 v6 under Windows 64 bit?

The pages at:

http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/javasdk/v6r0/index.jsp

refer to some AIX/Linux "scaling support":

http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/javasdk/v6r0/topic/com.ibm.java.doc.user.aix32.60/user/scale.html

but don't seem to offer information for Windows.

Thanks

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stackoverflow.com/questions/5437770/… offer some generic thoughts, I'm interested for IBM's J9 implementation in particular –  gliptak Feb 29 '12 at 16:18
    
The number of threads is almost invariably capped by their combined stack size, not by the arbitrary limits of the OS. –  Viruzzo Feb 29 '12 at 16:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For a 32-bit VM, the thread stack size is a limiting factor, however for a 64-bit VM, the thread limit doesn't appear to be dependant on the stack size.

The simplest thing to do is to create lots of threads and see at what point it fails.

Testing on Linux 64-bit the limit appears to be about 32,000

http://vanillajava.blogspot.com/2011/07/java-what-is-limit-to-number-of-threads.html

Given most computers have only 2 - 24 logical threads, creating much more than this can mean more overhead than benefit, unless you have a heavily IO bound process.

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It seems that the need to "measure it" is not the best way to go about this, but it is practical ... –  gliptak Mar 1 '12 at 14:35

After reading

What's the default heap size for IBM's J9VM?

I looked at

http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/javasdk/v6r0/topic/com.ibm.java.doc.diagnostics.60/diag/appendixes/defaults.html

For 2GB memory and the max 512K stack per thread, the max (hard) number of threads comes out 4096 (of course this ignores overhead ...)

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