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I got into a very strange situation (to me) when an echo statement can prevent me from getting standard out message from an subsequent command

This is my test.py:

print "Test Only"

This is my test.sh:

start() {
    # Sample code to make sure that code within the if .. fi is executed
    if [ 1 -eq 1 ]; then
        echo "Start server"
        /usr/bin/python test.py
    fi; 
}

start

Actual output when executing /bin/bash test.sh:

Start server

Expected output:

Start server

Test Only

My solution (workaround):

If I comment out the line echo "Start server", I can get the message Test Only as usual.

My conclusion is that echo statement makes something wrong here. But it is out of my knowledge. Could you help me to understand why this can happen.

Another solution:

start() {
    # Sample code to make sure that code within the if .. fi is executed
    if [ 1 -eq 1 ]; then
        MSG1="Start server"
        MSG2=`/usr/bin/python test.py`
        echo $MSG1
        echo $MSG2
    fi; 
}

Updated

Thank to @ghoti, I have solved my issue: there may be some invisible characters in my code. Eliminating them all and it works now

share|improve this question
1  
Um, I created both files and then ran it and I get your expected output Start server\nTest Only :/ –  Roadmaster Feb 29 '12 at 17:02
    
Have you tried reversing the order of the two lines? I bet that will be instructive. –  Marcin Feb 29 '12 at 17:04
    
@Marcin Just reversed the order of the two lines and I got "Test Only". The echo statement disappears :) So weird. I guess that it is not about bash or python but a Ubuntu settings??? –  pcdinh Feb 29 '12 at 17:13

3 Answers 3

Works for me.

ghoti@pc $ cat echotest
#!/usr/local/bin/bash

start() {
    # Sample code to make sure that code within the if .. fi is executed
    if [ 1 -eq 1 ]; then
        echo "Start server"
        /usr/local/bin/python echotest.py
    fi
}

start

ghoti@pc $ cat echotest.py 

print "Test only"

ghoti@pc $ ./echotest
Start server
Test only
ghoti@pc $ 

Is there perhaps a problem with your line endings? Are you editing these files natively in the OS that runs bash, or copying them from a Windows box?

That said, I recommend you structure your start script a little differently. Assuming your python script is launching something in the background, you could do something like this:

#!/bin/bash

start() {
  # Sample code to make sure that code within the if .. fi is executed
  echo -n "mydaemon "
  if /usr/local/bin/python mydaemon.py; then
    echo "started"
  else
    echo "FAILED to start"
  fi
}

start

If the python script it itself a daemon that needs to be backgrounded, you can't easily test for its success. And you wouldn't start it this way.

share|improve this answer
    
I do coding on Mac 10.6 and then test it on my Ubuntu 11 server. –  pcdinh Feb 29 '12 at 17:10
    
Okay. My workstation runs FreeBSD, and I manage servers that run FreeBSD, Ubuntu and Debian. So you'll need to adjust the position of the bash and python binaries.... But if you can describe your root goal better, then we can come up with better solutions. Getting advice on how to do something the wrong way isn't useful in the long run. :) –  ghoti Feb 29 '12 at 17:13
    
oh, sorry if my question is not clear enough. As you may see, the sample code is part of launch script that I use to execute a background process. Before I execute it, I print a message to notify that I am starting it. Then execute the background process. The background process can print out some messages if there is anything wrong. I hope that my bash script to capture it as usual. But it's not –  pcdinh Feb 29 '12 at 17:26
    
Got it. I truncate my bash file, write code from scratch to remove all invisible characters that may appear in my file accidentally. Now it works as a charm. Thanks –  pcdinh Feb 29 '12 at 18:23
1  
@pcdinh you need to click the checkmark and make it green so that ghoti gets the rep for helping you out and solving your problem. –  Jarrod Roberson Feb 29 '12 at 18:59

To capture command output, use back ticks. eg:

captured_output=`/usr/bin/python test.py`
echo $captured_output
share|improve this answer

Try using "/bin/echo" rather than echo (which is your shell's echo), and see if that helps?

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