Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to match all fractions in a string, returning fraction, numerator and denominator.

This is an example of input:

3/4 cup whole milk

I would like to get 3/4, 3 and 4 as output.

Here is the regular expression I'm using:

/(?<Fraction>(?<FracNum>\d*)\/(?<FracDem>\d*))/g

I tested this regular expression in an online tester and everything looks fine, but when I run it in javascript I get the following error:

**Uncaught SyntaxError: Invalid regular expression: /(?<Fraction>(?<FracNum>\d*)\/(?<FracDem>\d*))/: Invalid group**
share|improve this question
    
Can you give some examples of input and ouput? –  Siva Charan Feb 29 '12 at 17:04
    
I've updated the post with an example of input and output. Thanks –  Riccardo Bartoli Feb 29 '12 at 17:07

1 Answer 1

Named sub-patterns are not supported in JavaScript.

This should work:

/((\d*)\/(\d*))/g

though you might want + instead of *. The whole fraction will be the first group, the numerator the second, and the denominator the third.

If you want to do something with each fraction, one nice way to do that is this:

someString.replace(/((\d*)\/(\d*))/g, function(_, fraction, numerator, denominator) {
  doSomething(fraction, numerator, denominator);
});
share|improve this answer
    
So can I use something specific to return those matches? –  Riccardo Bartoli Feb 29 '12 at 17:08
    
I edited the answer a little; I'm not sure exactly what it is you want to do with the matched fraction strings. –  Pointy Feb 29 '12 at 17:11
    
+1 This is exactly what I was trying to do. I got a function that is multiplying the fraction and replacing it in the main string. Thanks a lot –  Riccardo Bartoli Feb 29 '12 at 17:15
    
In case I'm also running this regular expression /[0-9]+(?:\.[0-9]*)?/g, can I find a way to prevent it from selecting fractions so it doesn't return matches that I've been previously returned with the one you provided? –  Riccardo Bartoli Feb 29 '12 at 17:20
    
@user1209359 you could change your second regex to not match fractions and run it first. –  markw Feb 29 '12 at 17:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.