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I came across the following code snippet in C++ (I am not yet on C++11):

int test(std::map<int, size_t> &threshold, const int value) {
  std::map<int, size_t>::const_iterator itr = threshold.upper_bound(value);

  if (threshold.begin() == itr) {
    return -1;
  }
  return return (--itr)->second;
}

In particular, I do not like the use of --itr at the end nor the compare of itr to begin(), they both feel wrong to me.

I'm wondering if there is a way with STL to do some kind of lookup that would return end() (or rend()) if not found and otherwise to return the last element that is less than or equal to the value so the code would look more like this:

int test(std::map<int, size_t> &threshold, const int value) {
  std::map<int, size_t>::const_reverse_iterator itr = threshold.WhatGoesHere(value);

  if (threshold.rend() == itr) {
    return -1;
  }
  return return itr->second;
}

In a sense, I want a reverse_lower_bound() that returns a reverse iterator to the last element that is not greater than the value or if none can be found rend().

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I retract my comment, it'll not be the same. I'm currently working on an answer. –  Xeo Feb 29 '12 at 17:25
    
Even though you don't like the code you started with, it looks OK to me. There's nothing wrong with comparing an iterator to begin() and nothing wrong with decrementing it. –  Mark Ransom Feb 29 '12 at 17:28
    
@Mark: Are you sure? IIRC, lower_bound returns equal or greater, while upper_bound returns strictly greater. –  Xeo Feb 29 '12 at 17:29
    
@Xeo, yup I messed up on that. Deleting my comment. –  Mark Ransom Feb 29 '12 at 17:33
    
@Xeo It looked correct to me given that reversing an iterator gives you prior element. Note I edited the last paragraph of question, it did not match the code's behavior. –  WilliamKF Feb 29 '12 at 17:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Based on Xeo's comment, I think this is the answer:

int test(std::map<int, size_t> &threshold, const int value) {
  std::map<int, size_t>::const_reverse_iterator
    last_element_not_greater_than(threshold.upper_bound(value));

  if (threshold.rend() == last_element_not_greater_than) {
    return -1;
  }
  return return last_element_not_greater_than->second;
}

I learned this new thing:

When an iterator is reversed, the reversed version does not point to the same
element in the range, but to the one preceding it.
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3  
I didn't know that about reverse iterators either. Citation: cplusplus.com/reference/std/iterator/reverse_iterator –  Mark Ransom Feb 29 '12 at 17:43

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