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Handling files (opening) is an activity particularly prone to error.

If you were to write a function to do this (although trivial), what is the best way to write it in wrt handling errors?

Is the following good?

if (File.Exists(path))
{ 
    using (Streamwriter ....)
    { // write code }
}

else
// throw error if exceptional else report to user

Would the above (although not syntactially correct) a good way to do this?

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What if the user deletes the file between the if and the using? – SLaks Feb 29 '12 at 17:36
1  
up vote 2 down vote accepted

First you can verify if you have access to the file, after, if the file exists and between the creation of the stream use a try catch block, look:

public bool HasDirectoryAccess(FileSystemRights fileSystemRights, string directoryPath)
{
    DirectorySecurity directorySecurity = Directory.GetAccessControl(directoryPath);

    foreach (FileSystemAccessRule rule in directorySecurity.GetAccessRules(true, true, typeof(System.Security.Principal.NTAccount)))
    {
        if ((rule.FileSystemRights & fileSystemRights) != 0)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

So:

if (this.HasDirectoryAccess(FileSystemRights.Read, path)
{
    if (File.Exists(path))   
    {  
        try
        {      
            using (Streamwriter ....)       
            { 
                // write code 
            }   
        }
        catch (Exception ex)            
        {    
            // throw error if exceptional else report to user or treat it                          
        } 
    }      
    else
    {
        // throw error if exceptional else report to user   
    }
}

Or you can verify all things with the try catch, and create the stream inside the try catch.

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Accessing external resources is always prone to error. Use a try catch block to manage the access to file system and to manage the exception handling (path/file existence, file access permissions and so on)

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You can use something like this

    private bool CanAccessFile(string FileName)
    {
        try
        {
            var fileToRead = new FileInfo(FileName);
            FileStream f = fileToRead.Open(FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None);
            /*
                 * Since the file is opened now close it and we can access it
                 */
            f.Close();
            return true;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("Cannot open " + FileName + " for reading. Exception raised - " + ex.Message);
        }

        return false;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
+0 - while it is possible to do and have some benefits one still have to handle exactly the same conditions when actually using the file as file properties can change between checking permissions and actual access. Handling error on actual usage is more reliable. – Alexei Levenkov Feb 29 '12 at 17:46

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