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Example:

> SELECT name, culture FROM city_i18n WHERE ID = 2745;
+-------+---------+
| name  | culture |
+-------+---------+
| Paris | en_GB   |
| París | es_ES   |
| Paris | pt_BR   |
| Paris | pt_PT   |
+-------+---------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)

> SELECT DISTINCT name FROM city_i18n WHERE ID = 2745 AND culture IN ('es_ES', 'en_GB');
+-------+
| name  |
+-------+
| Paris |
+-------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

> SELECT DISTINCT name FROM city_i18n WHERE ID = 2745 AND culture IN ('es_ES', 'pt_PT');
+-------+
| name  |
+-------+
| París |
+-------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

Note the different output of the two SELECT DISTINCT: Paris, París (with accent)

Now, what is a simple method to always give es_ES priority (i.e. to always get París with accent)?

As there have been questions, some clarification: City names that only differ by accents (according to collation) should only show up once. In this case, the name that shows up should have the accents of culture es_ES.

share|improve this question
1  
I'm not sure I follow. What do you mean by priority? If you do SELECT DISTINCT name FROM city_i18n WHERE ID = 2745, doesn't both versions Paris and París show up? Do you only want París to show? –  BD. Feb 29 '12 at 17:46
    
@BD, just added clarification. –  feklee Feb 29 '12 at 19:11

3 Answers 3

The problem is the Collation Sequence in use in your database. There is a huge amount of information about Collation Sequences out there depending on your RDBMS. You need to be very careful when changing the collation sequence as it can have unexpected consequences.

The Collation Sequence is used to test the equality or inequality of columns. Depending on the Collation in use the following statements could all evaluate to either true or false:

'TexT' = 'text'
'TEXT' = 'text'
'áéíóú' = 'aeiou'

In your situation you would need to pick a Collation Sequence which would treat accented letters and regular letters as distinct values. Currently your database is determining that they are equal. Once you have that in place you can then develop your logic to select the appropriate value based on your prefered culture

Just to add it appears that your database is currently determining that Paris = Parísand I would suspect that there is no guarantee which distinct value will be selected, similar to the fact that there is no determined order of a results set unless an ORDER BY clause is used.

I thought about this for a while. I think the best thing to do would be create a CultureRank

CREATE TABLE CultureRank
(
    Rank INTEGER,
    Culture VARCHAR(5)
);

INSERT INTO CultureRank VALUES (1, 'es_ES');
INSERT INTO CultureRank VALUES (2, 'en_GB');
INSERT INTO CultureRank VALUES (3, 'pt_BR');
INSERT INTO CultureRank VALUES (4, 'pt_PT');

SELECT
    Name
FROM
    City_i18n
    LEFT JOIN CultureRank ON City_i18n.Culture = CultureRank.Culture
WHERE
    ID = 2745
AND City_i18n.Culture IN ('es_ES', 'pt_PT') -- If Required
ORDER BY
    IF(ISNULL(CultureRank.Culture),1,0), 
    CultureRank.Rank
LIMIT 1;

The ORDER BY ISNULL is required if there will be cultures in city_i18n that are not in CultureRank. The IsNull function here will ensure that the cultures in the CultureRank table are given top priority, and then if none of those are associated with the city then the engine will select a random culture from the city_i18n table for that city. If you would prefer the cultures that are NOT in CultureRank to be the top priority then swap the 1 & 0 parameters in the ISNULL function.

EDIT:

SELECT
    Name
FROM
    City_i18n
    LEFT JOIN CultureRank ON City_i18n.Culture = CultureRank.Culture
WHERE
    ID = 2745
AND City_i18n.Culture IN ('es_ES', 'pt_PT') -- If Required
AND NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT
        NULL
    FROM
        City_i18n Cities
        LEFT JOIN CultureRank CitiesRank ON Cities.Culture = CitiesRank.Culture
    WHERE
        City_i18n.Name = Cities.Name
    AND CultureRank.Rank < CitiesRank.Rank)

That should get you each Name from the City_i18n table for the given ID unless there is another record with the same name, based on your collation sequence, that has a higher rank in the CultureRank table.

share|improve this answer
    
I perfectly like the Collation Sequence in place. It's just that - in case of equality - I always want to show the name with accents for es_ES. Now I understand your proposal to write my own comparison logic. But do you have any suggestion how to proceed? –  feklee Feb 29 '12 at 19:07
    
@feklee - See changes in relation to the Culture Rank. MySql doesn't have the partition analytic functions that are available in Oracle so it makes it more difficult to order each culture per city. You could declare the culture rank as a temporary table each time you want to run the query but it may be better to store it permanently if the priority will be constant for all cities. –  Tobsey Mar 1 '12 at 9:59
    
Your proposal with culture rank is interesting, but it will return the wrong result for cities where names are considered different by the selected collation. In this case, both city names should appear (e.g. "New York" and "Nueva York"). –  feklee Mar 1 '12 at 10:07
    
No Collation Sequence is going to say that 'Nueva York' = 'New York' is true ;-). If you need to do that you are going to need a City table with an ID and Description. The descriptions code be stored in whatever language you wish, it doesn't matter. Then your city_i18n table will need a CityID column so that you can have multiple language versions of the city name while still being able to group them together using the CityID. –  Tobsey Mar 1 '12 at 10:13
    
Read again: "New York" and "Nueva York" are different and should be treated as different. I.e. there should be two rows in the result for this city. –  feklee Mar 1 '12 at 10:53

Unicode in PHP/MySQL is a pain. Take the following two lines of code:

setlocale(LC_ALL, 'en_US.utf8');
mysql_query("SET NAMES 'utf8'");

and sprinkle them throughout your code like holy water.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Looks like I found a solution:

 SELECT name FROM city_i18n
 WHERE (name != (SELECT name FROM city_i18n WHERE ID = 2745 AND culture = 'es_ES') 
        OR culture = 'es_ES')
 AND ID = 2745 AND culture IN ('es_ES', 'en_GB');

If there is a better solution, I am happy to hear about it!

share|improve this answer
    
I haven't ran that query but does that not return 2 rows? Both Paris and París? –  Tobsey Mar 1 '12 at 9:48
    
No, it returns only one row ("París"). As intended, it will only return two rows if the city names are not considered identical according to the collation (e.g. "New York" and "Nueva York"). –  feklee Mar 1 '12 at 10:00

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