Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Are measurable performance gains possible from using VC++'s __assume? If so, please post proof with code and benchmarks in your answer.

The sparse MSDN article on __assume: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/1b3fsfxw(v=vs.100).aspx

Mentioned in the article is the use of __assume(0) to make switch statements faster by __assume(0)ing the default case. I measured no performance increase from using __assume(0) in that way:

void NoAssumeSwitchStatement(int i)
{
    switch (i)
    {
    case 0:
        vector<int>();
        break;
    case 1:
        vector<int>();
        break;
    default:
        break;
    }
}

void AssumeSwitchStatement(int i)
{
    switch (i)
    {
    case 0:
        vector<int>();
        break;
    case 1:
        vector<int>();
        break;
    default:
        __assume(0);
    }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    const int Iterations = 1000000;
    LARGE_INTEGER start, middle, end;
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&start);
    for (int i = 0; i < Iterations; ++i)
    {
        NoAssumeSwitchStatement(i % 2);         
    }
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&middle);
    for (int i = 0; i < Iterations; ++i)
    {
        AssumeSwitchStatement(i % 2);
    }
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&end);
    LARGE_INTEGER cpuFrequency;
    QueryPerformanceFrequency(&cpuFrequency);
    cout << "NoAssumeSwitchStatement: " << (((double)(middle.QuadPart - start.QuadPart)) * 1000) / (double)cpuFrequency.QuadPart << "ms" << endl;
    cout << "  AssumeSwitchStatement: " << (((double)(end.QuadPart - middle.QuadPart)) * 1000) / (double)cpuFrequency.QuadPart << "ms" << endl;
    return 0;
}

Rounded console output, 1000000 iterations:

NoAssumeSwitchStatement: 46ms
AssumeSwitchStatement: 46ms

share|improve this question
1  
Your example seems too trivial. If you look at the assembler output, it will be the same. NOP. –  ydroneaud Feb 29 '12 at 18:15
    
IMO it would have made more sense when the compiler knows the default case cannot be reached when you just leave it out instead of a dull assume instruction... –  demorge Feb 29 '12 at 21:21
    
__assume is a hint to the optimizer, most useful at higher levels of optimization. (i.e. going beyound register allocation and CSE). At those levels, this example can be expected to fully inlined; i.e. both your 2 function calls and all 4 temporaries created. –  MSalters Mar 1 '12 at 9:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Seems it does make a little difference if you set the right compiler switches...

Three runs follow. No optimizations, opt for speed and opt for size.

This run has no optimizations

C:\temp\code>cl /EHsc /FAscu assume.cpp
Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 16.00.40219.01 for 80x86

assume.cpp
Microsoft (R) Incremental Linker Version 10.00.40219.01

/out:assume.exe
assume.obj

C:\temp\code>assume
NoAssumeSwitchStatement: 29.5321ms
  AssumeSwitchStatement: 31.0288ms

This is with max optimizations (/Ox) Note that /O2 was basically identical speedwise.

C:\temp\code>cl /Ox /EHsc /Fa assume.cpp
Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 16.00.40219.01 for 80x86

assume.cpp
Microsoft (R) Incremental Linker Version 10.00.40219.01
/out:assume.exe
assume.obj

C:\temp\code>assume
NoAssumeSwitchStatement: 1.33492ms
  AssumeSwitchStatement: 0.666948ms

This run was to minimize code space

C:\temp\code>cl -O1 /EHsc /FAscu assume.cpp
Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 16.00.40219.01 for 80x86
assume.cpp
Microsoft (R) Incremental Linker Version 10.00.40219.01
/out:assume.exe
assume.obj

C:\temp\code>assume
NoAssumeSwitchStatement: 5.67691ms
  AssumeSwitchStatement: 5.36186ms

Note that the output assembly code agrees with what Matthiu M. had to say when speed opts are used. The switch functions were called in other cases.

share|improve this answer
    
Jim, I was able to reproduce your middle performance gain finding using VS2010. The performance gain does not show up in VS2008. Thanks. –  Neil Justice Mar 1 '12 at 21:42
    
Additional finding: The __assume(0) switch statement optimization only works with the x86 VS2010 compiler and not the x64 VS2010 compiler. –  Neil Justice Mar 2 '12 at 15:50
    
@Neil Justice: 5 years ago or so this type of optimization was important to me as I was trying to saturate a gigabit ethernet. One thing I learned while working on that was that the prefetch intrinsics, when used correctly would speed things up a crazy amount. So if you're looking for that type of speedup, look closely at the intrinsics. I had 2 orders of magnitude speed improvement on a hash function that worked on 128 byte strings from simply getting the prefetch in the right place. I didn't try x64 or VS 2008 because neither is available to me at this time. :) –  JimR Mar 2 '12 at 17:21

Benchmark lies. They rarely measure what you want them to. In this particular case, the methods were probably inlined, and so the __assume was just redundant.

As to the actual question, yes it may help. A switch is generally implemented by a jump table, by reducing the size of this table, or removing some entries, the compiler might be able to select better CPU instructions to implement the switch.

In your extreme case, it can turn the switch into a if (i == 0) { } else { } structure, which is usually efficient.

Furthermore, trimming dead branches help keeping code tidy, and less code means a better usage of the CPU instruction cache.

However, those are micro-optimizations, and they rarely pay off: you need a profiler to point them out you, and even them it might be difficult to understand the particular transformation to make (is __assume the best ?). This is expert's work.

EDIT: In action with LLVM

void foo(void);
void bar(void);

void regular(int i) {
  switch(i) {
  case 0: foo(); break;
  case 1: bar(); break;
  }
}

void optimized(int i)  {
  switch(i) {
  case 0: foo(); break;
  case 1: bar(); break;
  default: __builtin_unreachable();
  }
}

Note that the only difference is the presence, or absence of the __builtin_unreachable() which is similar to MSVC __assume(0).

define void @regular(i32 %i) nounwind uwtable {
  switch i32 %i, label %3 [
    i32 0, label %1
    i32 1, label %2
  ]

; <label>:1                                       ; preds = %0
  tail call void @foo() nounwind
  br label %3

; <label>:2                                       ; preds = %0
  tail call void @bar() nounwind
  br label %3

; <label>:3                                       ; preds = %2, %1, %0
  ret void
}

define void @optimized(i32 %i) nounwind uwtable {
  %cond = icmp eq i32 %i, 1
  br i1 %cond, label %2, label %1

; <label>:1                                       ; preds = %0
  tail call void @foo() nounwind
  br label %3

; <label>:2                                       ; preds = %0
  tail call void @bar() nounwind
  br label %3

; <label>:3                                       ; preds = %2, %1
  ret void
}

And note here how the switch statement in regular can be optimized into a simple comparison in optimized.

This maps to the following x86 assembly:

    .globl  regular                  |      .globl  optimized
    .align  16, 0x90                 |      .align  16, 0x90
    .type   regular,@function        |      .type   optimized,@function
regular:                             |    optimized:
.Ltmp0:                              |    .Ltmp3:
    .cfi_startproc                   |            .cfi_startproc
# BB#0:                              |    # BB#0:
    cmpl    $1, %edi                 |            cmpl    $1, %edi
    je      .LBB0_3                  |            je      .LBB1_2
# BB#1:                              |
    testl    %edi, %edi              |
    jne     .LBB0_4                  |
# BB#2:                              |    # BB#1:
    jmp     foo                      |            jmp     foo
.LBB0_3:                             |    .LBB1_2:
    jmp     bar                      |            jmp     bar
.LBB0_4:                             |
    ret                              |
.Ltmp1:                              |    .Ltmp4:
    .size   regular, .Ltmp1-regular  |      .size   optimized, .Ltmp4-optimized
.Ltmp2:                              |    .Ltmp5:
    .cfi_endproc                     |      .cfi_endproc
.Leh_func_end0:                      |    .Leh_func_end1:

Note how, in the second case:

  • the code is tighter (less instructions)
  • there is a single comparison/jump (cmpl/je) on all paths (and not one path with a single jump and a path with two)

Also note how this is so close that I have no idea how to measure anything else than noise...

On the other hand, semantically it does indicate an intent, though perhaps an assert could be better suited for the semantics only.

share|improve this answer
    
Matthieu, speculating about whether or not the compiler performs one optimization or another is all well and good, but can you come up with code and benchmarks that show a use of __assume that benefits performance? –  Neil Justice Feb 29 '12 at 19:16
    
@NeilJustice: I have added LLVM IR and x86 assembly. I don't have Visual Studio at hand (and don't plan to ever have it again) so I used Clang's __builtin_unreachable instead. I have not benchmarked the code, JimR's answer seem pretty exhaustive on that point and... anyway in real world functions it'll probably be drown in the noise. –  Matthieu M. Mar 1 '12 at 7:41
    
Matthieu, I was able to confirm your finding of assembly instruction differences between __assume(0) and not __assume(0) in assembly output by VS2010. Thanks. –  Neil Justice Mar 2 '12 at 16:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.