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I'm trying to convert a simple Haskell datatype and a function to OO. But I'm confused..

Have the following Haskell type for arithmetic calculation:

data Expr = Lit Int | 
      Add Expr Expr |
   deriving Show

--Turn the expr to a nice string
showExpr :: Expr -> String 
showExpr (Lit n) = show n
showExpr (Add e1 e2) = "(" ++ showExpr e1 ++ "+" ++ showExpr e2 ++ ")"

Now I'm trying to convert..

public interface Expr {
  String showExpr(String n);
} 

// Base case
public class Lit implements Expr {
  String n;

  public Lit(String n) {
    this.n = n;
  }

  @Override
  public String ShowExpr() {
    return n;
  }
}

public class Add implements Expr {
  Expr a;
  Expr b;

  public Add(Expr aExpr, Expr bExpr) {
    this.a = aExpr;
    this.b = bExpr;
  }

  public String ShowExpr() {
    return "(" + a.ShowExpr() + "+" + b.ShowExpr() + ")";
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Lit firstLit  = new Lit("2");
    Lit secLit = new Lit("3");
    Add add = new Add(firstLit,secLit);
    System.out.println(add.ShowExpr());
  }
}

This will result in "(2+3)", it's correct answer.

But.. I'm not sure.. is this the right way to think about it and model it in OO ?

Is't a good representation of the Haskell datatype ?

share|improve this question
3  
I think your convertion is real good. The only thing I can comment it that Expr should be an abstract Class instead of a interface. And don't use java for this kind of problems becouse haskell are much better at this. – nist Feb 29 '12 at 18:47
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Let's copy the code as closely as we can.

Here are some properties that the Haskell data structure has:

  1. It has the type Expr and two constructors Lit and Add
  2. You cannot add or remove constructors from the "outside"

So, if we want these properties to stay true in the Java version, you should do it like this:

public abstract class Expr {
    // So that you can't add more subclasses outside this block
    private Expr() {}

    // Simulate pattern matching:
    // (This CAN be done with instanceof, but that's ugly and not OO)
    public boolean isLit() {
        return false;
    }
    public boolean isAdd() {
        return false;
    }
    public Lit asLit() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("This is not a Lit");
    }
    public Add asAdd() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("This is not an Add");
    }

    public static class Lit extends Expr {
        public final int n;
        public Lit(int n) {
            this.n = n;
        }
        @Override
        public boolean isLit() {
            return true;
        }
        @Override
        public Lit asLit() {
            return this;
        }
    }

    public static class Add extends Expr {
        public final Expr a, b;
        public Lit(Expr a, Expr b) {
            this.a = a;
            this.b = b;
        }
        @Override
        public boolean isAdd() {
            return true;
        }
        @Override
        public Add asAdd() {
            return this;
        }
    }
}

Now, to convert showExpr:

public static String showExpr(final Expr expr) {
    if(expr.isLit()) {
        return Integer.toString(expr.asLit().n);
    } else if(expr.isAdd()) {
        return "(" + expr.asAdd().a + "+" + expr.asAdd().b + ")";
    }
}

You can put showExpr as a static method in the Expr class. I would not make it an instance method, because that strays further from the Haskell version.

share|improve this answer
5  
I see no real difference between if(e.isLit()) { Lit l = e.asLit(); } and if(e instanceof Lit) { Lit l = (Lit)e; }. Haskell-style pattern matching is inherently not OO, so trying to hide that fact with methods that simulate instanceof and casts brings nothing to the code. – yshavit Feb 29 '12 at 19:00
    
@yshavit, you are right, of course, but I think that the style I present leads to easier-to-read code, and less bugs like if(foo instanceof Foo) { ((Bar)foo).bla(); } due to refactoring (Foo != Bar). I might also for example want to make Add and Lit into private classes and use factory methods for them, and in that case, instanceof won't work. – dflemstr Feb 29 '12 at 23:12
    
Whether e instanceof Lit is more or less readable than e.isLit() I'll leave as a matter of opinion. :) But note that if they're private classes, e.asLit().n won't work, either. – yshavit Feb 29 '12 at 23:51
    
Of course; I was just discussing the is/asFoo pattern. – dflemstr Mar 1 '12 at 0:25

I would slightly turn this on its head: each Haskell class becomes a Java interface, and instance ...where (or derives) becomes implements.

So, class Show a becomes

interface Showable {
    String show();
}

Now then, what does the Expr data type do? It combines various Haskell constructors -- aka Java classes -- into a single type, and also says they all are covered by Haskell classes (ie implement Java interfaces). So, I would then say that the data type Expr becomes

interface Expr extends Showable {}

and the Lit constructor, for instance, becomes:

class Lit implements Expr {
    @Override
    String show() {
        ...
    }
}

Now you can have Java collections that include both Lit and Add instances (e.g. List<Expr>), and for any Expr, you know it implements Showable.

Note that by pulling Showable as its own interface (rather than putting its method directly on Expr as you did), I allow other, completely unrelated Java classes to also implement it. This is akin to how anybody can define an instance ... where of any Haskell class you define.

Finally, there's a couple mismatches between open-world and closed-world policies here. Haskell's instance ... where is open-world, whereas Java's implements is closed. But Haskell's constructors-per-type is closed, whereas Java's extends is mostly open.

There's not much you can do about implements being closed, but you can close the extends with an abstract class and a private constructor, so that's what I would do (if you want that behavior). Tweaking the above a bit, we get:

public abstract class Expr implements Showable {
    private Expr() {
        // hide the ctor from the outside world, so nobody else
        // can extend this class
    }

    public static class Lit extends Expr {
        ...
    }

    public static class Add extends Expr {
        ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That would be okay if the original code would use a type class, but I think this is overkill for modelling a simple ADT. – Landei Feb 29 '12 at 21:22

I would translate it that way:

public abstract class Expr {

    public static Expr Lit(final int n) {
        return new Expr() {
            public String showExpr() {
                return "" + n;
            }
        };
    }

    public static Expr Add(final Expr e1, final Expr e2) {
        return new Expr() {
            public String showExpr() {
                return String.format("(%s+%s)", e1.showExpr(), e2.showExpr());
            }
        };
    }

    public abstract String showExpr();

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Expr firstLit = Lit(2);
        Expr secLit = Lit(3);
        Expr add = Add(firstLit, secLit);
        System.out.println(add.showExpr());
    }
}

In Haskell Lit and Add are no subtypes (there is no such thing in Haskell) but just Expressions. There is no need to expose the subclasses in Java, which I why I could use anonymous classes hidden in some methods. This works perfect, as long as you don't need pattern matching (which is hard to model in Java anyway, as the simple instanceof test gets soon messy with more complicated examples).

share|improve this answer

Your code looks fine, but could be a little more idiomatic. You can use final to make fields immutable, for example. You might as well replace showExp with toString (which is declared in Object), unless you want toString to do something different. Using String.format is a little cleaner than concatenating several strings, in my opinion. Finally, I would have Lit store an int, since it's more compact and type safe.

Here's how I would translate it:

abstract class Exp {
  // Force subclasses to override Object.toString.
  public abstract String toString();
}

class Lit extends Exp {
  final int value;

  Lit(int value) {
    this.value = value;
  }

  public String toString() {
    return Integer.toString(value);
  }
}

class Add extends Exp {
  final Exp a, b;

  Add(Exp a, Exp b) {
    this.a = a;
    this.b = b;
  }

  public String toString() {
    return String.format("(%s + %s)", a, b);
  }
}

class Main {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Lit firstLit = new Lit(2);
    Lit secLit = new Lit(3);
    Add add = new Add(firstLit, secLit);
    System.out.println(add);
  }
}
share|improve this answer

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