Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to write a simple networked chat program in Java. I have almost no networking experience. I was wondering what resources I should begin looking at (beside here of course).

Sticking with the core Java API would be best for now.

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Manu, Jens, Alexey Malev, S.L. Barth, Uwe Plonus Oct 1 '14 at 11:26

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking us to recommend or find a book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it." – Manu, Jens, Alexey Malev, S.L. Barth, Uwe Plonus
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

9 Answers 9

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I found a great tutorial into networking and java from sun's own website: http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/networking/TOC.html

The socket section even has you write a mini client / server chat demo.

share|improve this answer

Nio or the traditional way with ServerSocket or Socket See java.net package

Nio docs here.

share|improve this answer
    
For the original poster's knowledge, NIO supports non-blocking IO, whereas the traditional form doesn't. Blocking IO is single threaded; non-blocking is multithreaded. If you're transferring files over a chat client and still want users to be able to type, NIO. –  Dean J Dec 10 '09 at 18:54

Sun's Java API and official tutorials are probably the best place to get your feet wet.

share|improve this answer

It's much more straight-forward than you would think. Honestly I'd just start browsing through the javadocs for the nio package. They should even contain mini-tutorials and source code.

Beyond that, java.sun.com should be littered with tutorials.

If you don't understand sockets---well I could send you to a reference but it's easier to just tell you--sockets are a way 2 programs talk to each other. They are just a unique number that (when combined with your IP address) give you a unique path to a program. So if I "Listen" on port (socket) 1000, then another program connects to port 1000, anything the connecting program sends, the listening program receives.

Use a high port number (higher than, say, 5000) because there are many programs that assign their own port.

This is how virtually everything on your computer communicates.

You might want to read a really brief intro to socket communications if the API is still confusing.

share|improve this answer

I recommend you to first learn networking. If you have time read the Tanenbaum book, the greatest reference in networking. If you want a quick leard, here is a road map:

  • OSI layers
  • UDP and TCP/IP
  • Sockets
  • Broadcast and Multicast
  • Network security

Then go with Java: Socket, ServerSocket, DatagramSocket, RMI, etc.

share|improve this answer

Here's a pretty basic, easy to read Java networking tutorial too:

http://tutorials.jenkov.com/java-networking/index.html

share|improve this answer

Thought of this one too, but you were faster finding it :-)

Edit: Man... Stackoverflow is so damn fast... My post was thought as a response to the first entry and after posted there are two more. Awesome!

share|improve this answer

Google is your friend. Search for "java socket programming tutorial" or something like that and you'll get lots of results, including the one suggested by zxcv as well as these:

http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-12-1996/jw-12-sockets.html

http://www.cafeaulait.org/books/jnp/javanetexamples/index.html

share|improve this answer

"Head First Java" is a great beginners book and they do a tutorial on creating a simple chat program.

http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596004651/

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.