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This is for a Fraction program. I have private ints num and den, Fraction, and FractionInterface - the standard homework problem. I have done pretty much everything and now have been stuck for a few hours on the equals method. Since other is an Object, I can't equate it to Fraction. Here's what I have:

public boolean equals(Object other){        
     if (other == this){
         return true;
     } else {
         return false;
     }
}

This compiles but it gives incorrect results:

1/2 eq 1/2 = true
1/2 eq 1/2 = true
1/2 eq 1/2 = false
1/2 eq 1/2 = false

If I try other == Fraction, it doesn't compile. Thanks for any help!

share|improve this question
1  
Do you know what classes come in as other? Also, +1 for marking this homework and a well posed question! – macduff Feb 29 '12 at 20:45
    
Be aware that most of the answers so far will fail if other implements FractionInterface but is not of class Fraction. You should be clear in your mind whether you want a solution that works only when other is an instance of Fraction, or one that works when other is an instance of Fraction or one of its subclasses, or one that works for any object that implements FractionInterface. You need different code for each case. – Ted Hopp Feb 29 '12 at 20:54
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this out:

First, cast the other object

Fraction otherFraction = (Fraction) other;

Then, determine the condition that the two fractions are equivalent. This will include some logic involving the comparing of numerator and denominators (expect to use getNum() and getDen() for the otherFraction.

share|improve this answer
2  
This could blow up if other is the wrong type. – James Montagne Feb 29 '12 at 20:50
    
Thanks! I had already tried casting the 'other' object just like you said, but instead of getting the numerator and denominator from it, I was trying to directly compare it to the other fraction. Yet another simple mistake I was making. It works now, using the Get methods and cross multiplication. Thanks again!! – Boris4ka Feb 29 '12 at 21:09
    
Good call James. I remember in my AP Java class we were not expected to do anything about the fact that this statement can blow up. Without having to introduce reflection, I might suggest to beginners to try wrapping stuff in try-catch statements. – Prashant Kumar Feb 29 '12 at 21:12
    
I do have try-catch statements for exceptions. – Boris4ka Feb 29 '12 at 21:15
1  
equals() may get called elsewhere, where you don't have try-catch. It's a good practice to check if it is fine to cast first before casting. – Bob Wang Feb 29 '12 at 21:32

You can test if other is an instance of FractionInterface and use a cast:

public boolean equals(Object other){        
     if (other == this){
         return true;
     } else if (other instanceof FractionInterface) {
         FractionInterface fOther = (FractionInterface) other;
         // compare numerator and denominator...
     } else {
         return false;
     }
}

Note that instanceof will be false if other == null, so there's no need for a separate null check.

share|improve this answer

You should check whether the argument is an instance of your class and return false if it isn't and cast it to your class and compare according to your needs if it is. It's common to write equals() method like this:

public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (!(obj instanceof Fraction)) {
        return false;
    }
    Fraction that = (Fraction) obj;
    ... // Your algorithm to compare two fractions: this and that.
}

You should make sure that your algorithm for comparing two fractions meets all the requirements described in equals() documentation.

share|improve this answer

You need to test if the object has the Fraction class, and if so, cast it to a Fraction:

if (other.getClass() != Fraction.class) {
    return false;
}
Fraction otherFraction = (Fraction) other;
// compare the fields of this and otherFraction

Before doing this, make sure to also test for null.

share|improve this answer
1  
Out of curiosity, why not use instanceof? – James Montagne Feb 29 '12 at 20:49
    
Because if Fraction is extended and the subclass overrides equals, using instanceof would break the contract of equals: fraction.equals(subFraction) would be true, whereas subFraction.equals(fraction) would be false. – JB Nizet Feb 29 '12 at 20:53
    
It's very difficult to implement equals correctly with instanceof if Fraction has subclasses, so getClass is a popular alternative. – Joni Feb 29 '12 at 20:55
    
@JBNizet if extending the class breaks equals than you should not be using inheritance, this is where composition comes into play. – Woot4Moo Feb 29 '12 at 21:04
    
Extending the class doesn't break equals if it's properly implemented, by not using instanceof. If using instanceof, then equals should be final. – JB Nizet Feb 29 '12 at 21:07

You are comparing that the two objects references refer to the same object.

You will need to check that the other is of type Fraction and then type cast it to a Fraction. You are then about to compare the two parts of the Fraction.

share|improve this answer

I think you're close, but you're missing a few key concepts. This is because your as is won't work in all situations. Try this for example using your existing code...

Fraction a = // this is however you're making a fraction object...
Fraction b = // do EXACT same thing here that you did for a

// And then, this will illustrate what is wrong with your program...
if(a.equals(b)) {
  System.out.println("This won't print");
} else {
  System.out.println("This will print because your method just checks for reference");
}

So here are the basics you need to understand:

  1. Difference between == and equals
  2. Comparing type as opposed to reference or value
  3. Avoiding casting by putting your "equals" method in the proper place

First off...

public boolean equals(Object other){        
     if (other == this){
         return true;
     } else {
         return false;
     }
}

You're missing the point of the "equals" method in Java. == is used to compare references while this.equals(foo) is used to put the logic for comparing objects in a localized place.

The other concept you're missing is how instanceof should be used. When you ask this...

If I try other == Fraction, it doesn't compile.

This is because you're looking to compare the type of the object. To do this, you would simply do...

if(other instanceOf Fraction) {
  // do stuff...
}

All of that being said, there is one last concept, which is putting the equals definition in the proper place. You need to put it inside your Fraction class and define it like this...

public boolean equals(Fraction other) {
  // do something like this (you will have to define toDouble)
  if(this == other || this.toDouble() == other.toDouble()) {
    return true;
  }

  return false;
}

This will override the default...

public boolean equals(Object other) {/* ... */}

And it will make it EXTREMELY convenient. Here is some sample code of how...

Fraction fractionA = new Fraction("2/4");
Fraction fractionB = new Fraction("1/2");
Fraction fractionC = new Fraction("1/3");
Object trollObject = new Object();

// And then call random equals objects...
if(fractionA.equals(fractionB)) {
  // should be true...
}

if(fractionB.equals(fractionA)) {
  // should be true...
}

// This avoids having to do any casting because
// since you've only defined a Fraction.equals(Fraction) method
// it should instead default to the Object.equals method
if(trollObject.equals(fractionB)) {

}
share|improve this answer

Here's a quite standard pattern:

public boolean equals(Object other) {
    if (other == this) return true;
    if (other == null) return false;
    if (other.getClass() != this.getClass()) return false;

    Fraction o = (Fraction) other;
    // now you compare their num, den, and possibly sign
}

People may argue if we should use getClass() or instanceof. It matters only if Fraction is extended, and it depends on what you want if it is extended. Just keep in mind a contract of equals() is a.equals(b) should get the same result as b.equals(a) if neither one is null, and a subclass may have a different equals() that potentially breaks the contract.

share|improve this answer
    
This also won't work if other is not a Fraction at all but some other object implementing FractionInterface. – Ted Hopp Feb 29 '12 at 21:49
    
Right. It really depends on what you want if other is not a Fraction but implements FractionInterface. It's a gray area. When in doubt, I prefer returning false. If other has an extra sign field and we have no access to it, we should simply return false – Bob Wang Feb 29 '12 at 21:59

== operator compares hash codes of objects. That is reason why your method is not ok, you should write it like this :

public boolean equals(Object other){        
     if (other instanceof Fraction){
         return ((Fraction)other).getNum == this.num && ((Fraction)other).getDen == this.den;
     } else {
         return false;
     }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
This is wrong!! == compares what is stored on the stack. For primitives this is the acctual value and for objects it is the reference to the heap there the object is stored. The hashcode should be equal for two objects becouse there will be problems then using hashmaps – nist Feb 29 '12 at 20:52
    
Yes you are right my bad. It was late night when i was typing answer :) – dino.keco Mar 2 '12 at 9:35

I hope that it will helpful to you .try this code.

import java.io.*;

class Cast

{

public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException

{

BufferedReader br=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

byte a=20;

short s=31468;

int i=12345678;

char c=’c';

float f=3.56f;

//Widening or promotion [java question bank][1]

System.out.println(“a=(short)  “+(short) a);

System.out.println(“a=(int)  “+(int) a);

System.out.println(“a=(long)  “+(long)a);

System.out.println(“a=(float)  “+(float)a);

System.out.println();

System.out.println();

System.out.println(“s=(int) “+(int)s);

System.out.println(“s=(long)  “+(long)s);

System.out.println(“s=(float)  “+(float)s);

System.out.println();

System.out.println();

System.out.println(“i=(long)  “+(long)i);

System.out.println(“i=(float)  “+(float)i);

System.out.println(“i=(double)  “+(double)i);


//Narrowing using [java question bank][2]

System.out.println(“f=(byte)  “+(byte)f);

System.out.println(“f=(short)  “+(short)f);

System.out.println(“f=(char)  “+(char)f);

System.out.println(“f=(long)  “+(long)f);

System.out.println();

System.out.println();

System.out.println(“i=(byte)  “+(byte)i);

System.out.println(“i=(short)  “+(short)i);

System.out.println();

System.out.println();

System.out.println(“s=(byte)  “+(byte)s);


}

}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure this will help the OP. Care to elaborate? – GHC Apr 17 '13 at 15:55

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