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I have defined my table like this:

<div id="a">
    <table id="main_table" border="1">
        <tr>
            <th>Jobs</th>
            <th>Customers</th>
        </tr>
    </table>
</div>

From the example here i assume to see borders around the table and all the cells in the table. This hasn't worked me on multiple occasions lately. Does anyone know why? I am viewing in google Chrome.

Thanks!

** EDIT **

Thanks everyone, I failed to mention originally that this is a table I embedded in a Joomla site, as mentioned below, the border="1" does work in general. But since it hasn't been working I always use CSS. It just kept bugging me that the simple border="1" was not working. The individual borders must be getting turned off in the CSS for the Joomla theme. Thanks again.

share|improve this question
    
Works for me –  Second Rikudo Feb 29 '12 at 21:06
    
I would try to do it in CSS is possible. –  thescientist Feb 29 '12 at 21:07
    
@thescientist: Not really. The border attribute, though purely presentational, achieves very simply what is nearly impossible with pure CSS (to get a single border around all the cells and the table itself, and account for spacing, collapsing, etc.). Hence, I tend to still use the border attribute. –  Second Rikudo Feb 29 '12 at 21:08
    
You can also explicitly specify that the border goes around all columns and rows by adding rules="all" to your <table>, though I believe this is the default on every browser I've seen. –  Mike Christensen Feb 29 '12 at 21:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is something in the style sheets being applied that turn off the borders. I would guess that it might be some general-purpose “Reset CSS” stylesheet that some people and organizations favor, and e.g. the often-copied Eric Meyer’s Reset CSS sets table and cell borders to 0.

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That's an old way of placing a border around the table. The better way to place a border around a table and cells is by using CSS:

​table, td {
    border-collapse: separate;
    border: 1px solid #999;
}​

jsFiddle example

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I'm not here to debate on the old way versus the new way or which is better. Just saying...

As far as I know the border attribute on the table element is still standard in HTML5 and has not been "phased out." (See: http://www.w3schools.com/html5/tag_table.asp and http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/tabular-data.html#attr-table-border)

Though, it could be, I highly doubt it's a DOCTYPE issue. I tried your example code (I added an end tag to your open div), and the borders showed up just fine in various current browsers including Chrome.

I think you probably have some global CSS or something else in your code that you are using and haven't specifically mentioned here.

To clarify I used this exact code with the strict DTD and everything:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html>

<head>
    <title>test</title>
</head>

<body>
<div id="a">
<table id="main_table" border="1">
    <tr>
        <th>Jobs</th>
        <th>Customers</th>
    </tr>
</table>
</div>
</body>

</html>

Borders showed up in FF, IE8, and Chrome.

HTML5 supports 1 or empty string for this attribute.

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That's how borders were defined "back in the day," but with the new web standards, aka DOCTYPEs, most of the archaic syntax are slowly being phased out. So all in all, it may be because of the DOCTYPE you are using (or the lack thereof). For instance, DOCTYPE Strict will not recognize the border attribute.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">

More information here.

As for your problem, either change/define the DOCTYPE or use CSS instead: <table id="main_table" style="border: 1px solid #000;">

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The doctype will not stop browsers from rendering HTML borders for a good long while. –  BoltClock Mar 1 '12 at 13:09

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