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The question is simple: How can i pass data from model to view(or back to the controller) to display errors like "your password is too short"

Here is the controller

class UsersController extends Controller {

    private $username;
    private $password;

    function register()
    {
        if($_POST)
        {
            $this->User->username = $_POST['username'];
            $this->User->password = $_POST['password'];
            $this->User->register();
        }
    }



}

the model

class User extends Model {

    public $username;
    public $password;

    function register()
    {
        $username = $this->username;
        $password = $this->password;

        if (!empty($username) && !empty($password))
        {
            // registration process
        }
        else
        {
            // "you must provide a username and password" or something like that
        }
    }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just have your register function in your model return "PASSWORD"; to the controller and have your controller take the return from the model and return it to the view. Let the view interpret what the error output for "PASSWORD" is.

Example:

the controller

class UsersController extends Controller {

    private $username;
    private $password;

    function register()
    {
        if($_POST)
        {
            $this->User->username = $_POST['username'];
            $this->User->password = $_POST['password'];
            return $this->User->register();
        }
    }
}

the model

class User extends Model {

    public $username;
    public $password;

    function register()
    {
        $username = $this->username;
        $password = $this->password;

        if (!empty($username) && !empty($password))
        {
            // ...
            return "SUCCESS";
        }
        else
        {
            return "PASSWORD";
        }
    }
}

the view

$responses = array("SUCCESS" => "Registered Successfully!", "PASSWORD" => "You must provide a username and password!");

$result = $this->UsersController->register();
echo $responses[$result];
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Simply have your model methods to return a value, or throw exceptions, like any normal method. Then handle it in the controller. The view shouldn't touch the data directly from the model, that's the controller's job.

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public function addAction()
{
    $form = $this->_getForm();
    $this->view->form = $form;
    $this->render('add', null, true);
}

public function editAction()
{
    $id = $this->getRequest()->getParam(0);
    $Model = DI::get('yourclass_Model');
    $form = $this->_getForm();
    $data = $Model->getData();
    $form->populate($data);
    $this->view->flashMessages = $this->_helper->FlashMessenger->getMessages();
    $this->view->form = $form;
    $this->render('add', null, true);
}

public function saveAction()
{
    $form = $this->_getForm();
    $Model = DI::get('yourclass_Model');
    try{
    $saved = $Model->saveForm($form, $_POST);
    } catch (Exception $e) {
       echo "<pre>";
       print_r($e);
       exit;
    }
    if($saved)
    {
        $this->_helper->FlashMessenger('Record Saved!');
        $this->_redirect("edit".$form->id->getValue(), array('exit'=>true));
    } 
    $this->view->errorMessage = 'There were some errors';
    $this->view->form = $form;
    $this->render('add', null, true);
}
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Create a class which implements Singleton pattern and ArrayAccess interface. Or create something similar with dependency injection.

The ultimate solution would be if you create some validation architecture. (The model validates its self and it's error state is available in the views.)

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That's far FAR FAR from MVC. Bad idea. –  Second Rikudo Feb 29 '12 at 21:12
    
The Model can return anything from it's methods what can be inserted to a "global" container by the controller. I don't see why is this bad. –  Peter Kiss Feb 29 '12 at 21:16
    
    
I know that singleton is an anti pattern that is way i mentioned dependency injection. If you inject the same (for example) ViewData instance to the current controller and view then you have an easy to use communication chennel between two layer and you don't have a global object. –  Peter Kiss Feb 29 '12 at 21:31
    
MVC is simple. Controller gets request. Call model methods, gets results from model methods, calls views accordingly. I don't see where a Singleton can fit in here... –  Second Rikudo Feb 29 '12 at 21:33

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