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Suppose I want to write a function like the following (as usual, a trivial example for illustrative purposes):

Public Function calcSqSum(Of T)(ByVal list As IEnumerable(Of T)) As T
    Dim sumSq As T

    For Each item As T In list
        sumSq += (item * item)
    Next

    Return sumSq
End Function

As you can probably guess, this function causes an error because a generic object is not guaranteed to implement the + operator. As far as I know, though, any numerical type (Integer, Double, Decimal, etc.) will.

Is there a way to write a (quasi-)generic function that can accept any numerical type, without having to explicitly overload the function for every such type yourself?

Alternatively, I suppose an equally acceptable solution would be to somehow check if a type implements the '+' operator (or any operator generally associated with numerical types and used by the function).

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No, since there's no specific common interface that all of them implement. In essence, there's no real notion of "numerical types" in the framework. Unless you wrap them in self-defined classes and have your method accept only your types (which is not really a direct answer to your question, just a workaround).

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Couldn't have put it better myself. –  Garry Shutler Jun 4 '09 at 13:48
    
That's what I suspected... does this also mean, then, that there is no way to accomplish my secondary idea -- to check if a class implements a particular operator? –  Dan Tao Jun 4 '09 at 13:52
    
It's possible to check for a particular operator at runtime but not as a compile time generic constraint. Nothing like "where T.operator+" is possible. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jun 4 '09 at 13:54
    
Btw, if you want to prevent wrapping, you might make the class more flexible (remove the constraints) and blindly call operator + using reflection (essentially, duck typing). I'm sure I've seen an implementation of a calculation class that does this on SO. Search for it. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jun 4 '09 at 14:00

You can check this article: Using generics for calculations

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Sorry you can't unless you create your own number class.

public static T Add<T> (T x, T y) where T: MyNumberClass
{ 
// your add code
...
}

The reason is that .NET only lets you constrain a generic method with a class or an interface.

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Oh and if you don't want to create your number class, you could always just do the constraint checking inside the generic method itself. You won't have compile time errors like the "where" syntax but it will throw runtime exceptions. –  Khalid Abuhakmeh Jun 4 '09 at 13:57

You can use lambda expressions, like this:

        static T Add<T>(T a, T b)
    {
        // declare the parameters
        ParameterExpression paramA = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "a"),
            paramB = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "b");
        // add the parameters together
        BinaryExpression body = Expression.Add(paramA, paramB);
        // compile it
        Func<T, T, T> add = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, T, T>>(body, paramA, paramB).Compile();
        // call it
        return add(a, b);
    }

It will not be typesafe, but it will work for types that has the expected operator (addition, in the example above).

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You could use overloading instead. Either write an essentially identical function of each numeric type you want to support:

Public Function calcSqSum(ByVal list As IEnumerable(Of Integer)) As Integer
    Dim sumSq As Integer
    For Each item As Integer In list
        sumSq += (item * item)
    Next
    Return sumSq
End Function

Public Function calcSqSum(ByVal list As IEnumerable(Of Double)) As Double
    Dim sumSq As Double
    For Each item As Double In list
        sumSq += (item * item)
    Next
    Return sumSq
End Function

etc

Or, if it has a lot of code in it, make your generic function private and wrap it with overload public functions:

Private Function calcSqSum1(Of T)(ByVal list As IEnumerable(Of T)) As T
    Dim sumSq As T

    For Each item As T In list
        sumSq += (item * item)
    Next

    Return sumSq
End Function

Public Function calcSqSum(ByVal list As IEnumerable(Of Integer)) As Integer
    Return calcSqSum1(list)
End Function

Public Function calcSqSum(ByVal list As IEnumerable(Of Double)) As Double
    Return calcSqSum1(list)
End Function

etc

It's not quite what you're after, but the public functions will be type safe.

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