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I decided to see if assigning a reference to a member would make a member a reference. I wrote the following snippet to test it. There's a simple class Wrapper with an std::string as a member variable. I take take a const string& in the constructor and assign it to the public member variable. Later in the main() method I modify the member variable but the string I passed to the constructor remains unchanged, how come? I think in Java the variable would have changed, why not in this code snippet? How exactly do references work in this case?

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

class Wrapper
{
public:
   string str;

   Wrapper(const string& newStr)
   {
      str = newStr;
   }
};

int main (int argc, char * const argv[]) 
{
   string str = "hello";
   cout << str << endl;
   Wrapper wrapper(str);
   wrapper.str[0] = 'j'; // should change 'hello' to 'jello'
   cout << str << endl;
}
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2  
Types in C++ are what you decree, and they don't magically become something else. You say string, and you get a string. If you wanted a reference, you'd have said string &. –  Kerrek SB Feb 29 '12 at 21:38
    
You abused people with too simple question :) –  Mikhail Feb 29 '12 at 21:39
1  
In Java the variable wouldn't have changed because the code wouldn't even have compiled; strings in Java aren't allowed to be modified. –  Rob Kennedy Feb 29 '12 at 21:40

5 Answers 5

To assign a reference in a constructor you need to have a reference member

 class A{
     std::string& str;
 public:
     A(std::string& str_)
     :    str(str_) {} 
 };

str is now a reference to the value you passed in. Same applies for const refs

 class A{
     const std::string& str;
 public:
     A(const std::string& str_)
     :    str(str_) {} 
 };

However don't forget that once a reference has been assigned it can not be changed so if assignment requires a change to str then it will have to be a pointer instead.

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Because Wrapper::str is not a reference, it's an independent object. So when you do str = newStr, you're copying the string.

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class Wrapper
{
public:
   string& str;

   Wrapper(string& newStr) : str(newStr) {}
};

Note, you cannot accept a const string& and store it in a string&, you would lose const-correctness in doing so.

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You should declare Wrapper::str as a string&, not as a string.

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You need to use an initializer and declare str as a reference as in:

class Wrapper
{
public:
   string &str;

   Wrapper(string& newStr)
      : str(newStr)
   {
   }
};

The way you're writing it, all you are doing is copying the value of the reference you pass to the constuctor. You're not saving the reference. By declaring a reference as a class member and initializing it with a reference to another string instance, you will get the behavior you're looking for.

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Your code tries to initialize a reference-to-mutable with a reference-to-const. –  Luc Touraille Feb 29 '12 at 22:19
    
Fixed... that's what I get for blindly copying from the OP. –  andand Feb 29 '12 at 22:31

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