Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say, I have the following C++ code.

First I create a manual waitable timer as such:

HANDLE hWTimer = CreateWaitableTimer(NULL, FALSE, NULL);

Then it's set to a predefined time in the future to fire once (the actual value is provided by a user input):

double fSeconds2Wait = 10000;

LARGE_INTEGER li;
//Convert to 100 nanosecond intervals (MUST BE NEGATIVE)
li.QuadPart = -10000000LL * (LONGLONG)fSeconds2Wait;

SetWaitableTimer(hWTimer, &li, 0, NULL, NULL, 0);

Then I have a worker thread that resides in a waiting state, waiting for the timer to fire:

WaitForSingleObject(hWTimer, INFINITE);

//Perform actions when timer fires

The question I have, say, if I want to hold off the 'hWTimer' indefinitely with a possibility to reset it to another time later (upon user request), how do I do that?

share|improve this question
1  
from MSDN Docs (found with simple Google search ) - Timers are initially inactive. To activate a timer, call SetWaitableTimer. If the timer is already active when you call SetWaitableTimer, the timer is stopped, then it is reactivated. Stopping the timer in this manner does not set the timer state to signaled, so threads blocked in a wait operation on the timer remain blocked. However, it does cancel any pending completion routines. –  Dampsquid Feb 29 '12 at 22:10
    
@Dampsquid I'm sorry, but how does that answer my question? –  ahmd0 Feb 29 '12 at 22:13
    
it say you can call the SetWaitableTimer when its already running and it restarts it –  Dampsquid Feb 29 '12 at 22:15
1  
ok sound like u need to CancelWaitableTimer if you dont want it to run, then restart on user action when required. –  Dampsquid Feb 29 '12 at 22:22
1  
@Dampsquid: You should post your answer as an answer and ahmd0 should accept it. Otherwise, this question will forever appear to be unanswered and someone else with the same problem won't find it. –  Carey Gregory Mar 1 '12 at 1:21
show 3 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

from MSDN Docs

For SetWaitableTimer

Timers are initially inactive. To activate a timer, call SetWaitableTimer. If the timer is already active when you call SetWaitableTimer, the timer is stopped, then it is reactivated. Stopping the timer in this manner does not set the timer state to signaled, so threads blocked in a wait operation on the timer remain blocked. However, it does cancel any pending completion routines.

and For CancelWaitableTimer

The CancelWaitableTimer function does not change the signaled state of the timer. It stops the timer before it can be set to the signaled state and cancels outstanding APCs. Therefore, threads performing a wait operation on the timer remain waiting until they time out or the timer is reactivated and its state is set to signaled. If the timer is already in the signaled state, it remains in that state.

To reactivate the timer, call the SetWaitableTimer function.

So from this you can hold off your timer (and thread) by calling CancelWaitableTimer, and on request from the user, restart it by calling SetWaitableTimer.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.