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I'm trying to solve a recurrence relation to find out the complexity of an algorithm I wrote. This is the equation..

T(n) = T(n-1) + Θ(n)

And I found out the answer to O(n2), but I'm not sure if I did it right. Can someone please confirm?

Update: What if the equation is T(n) = T(n-1)+Θ(nlogn)? Will it still be O(n2)?

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You're right about O(n^2), but this isn't an equation that would be solved with the master method. –  interjay Feb 29 '12 at 22:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is O(N)+O(N-1)+...+O(1) = O(N*(N+1)/2). So yes, the total complexity is quadratic.

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What if the equation is T(n) = T(n-1)+Θ(nlogn)? Will it still be O(n2)? –  questions Feb 29 '12 at 22:32
    
@user1241347: My guess is O((N^2)*log(N)). But I have not calculated that. –  Juraj Blaho Feb 29 '12 at 22:37

Yes, you guess it right.

However, the form of the recurrence doesn't fit with Master method. Since you have guessed the bound correctly, substitution method is more suitable here.

Now your job is finding two constants c and n0 to prove that:

T(n) <= c*(n^2) forall n >= n0

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What if the equation is T(n) = T(n-1)+Θ(nlogn)? Will it still be O(n2)? –  questions Feb 29 '12 at 22:33
    
@user1241347: No, it will not. The new bound should be O((n^2)*logn). –  pad Feb 29 '12 at 22:41

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