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I'm currently writing a Spring MVC-based webapp.

Rather than writing one test for every annotated method, I would like to benefit from Parameterized JUnit runner.

Finally, I got it almost working, although I had to change all primitive arguments to their wrapper counterpart in my controller methods (and then manually do the sanity checks on null refs).

If it can help, here is the code (this also depends on Guava):

@RunWith(Parameterized.class)
public class MyControllerMappingTest {

    private MockHttpServletRequest request;
    private MockHttpServletResponse response;
    private MyController mockedController;
    private AnnotationMethodHandlerAdapter annotationHandlerAdapter;
    private final String httpMethod;
    private final String uri;
    private final String controllerMethod;
    private final Class<?>[] parameterTypes;
    private final Object[] parameterValues;

    @Before
    public void setup() {
        request = new MockHttpServletRequest();
        response = new MockHttpServletResponse();
        mockedController = mock(MyController.class);
        annotationHandlerAdapter = new AnnotationMethodHandlerAdapter();
    }

    @Parameters
    public static Collection<Object[]> requestMappings() {
        return asList(new Object[][] {
                {"GET", "/my/uri/0", "index", arguments(new MethodArgument(Integer.class, 0))}
        });
    }

    private static List<MethodArgument> arguments(MethodArgument... arguments) {
        return asList(arguments);
    }

    public MyControllerMappingTest(String httpMethod, String uri, String controllerMethod, List<MethodArgument> additionalParameters) {
        this.httpMethod = httpMethod;
        this.uri = uri;
        this.controllerMethod = controllerMethod;
        this.parameterTypes = new Class<?>[additionalParameters.size()];
        initializeParameterTypes(additionalParameters);
        this.parameterValues = newArrayList(transform(additionalParameters, valueExtractor())).toArray();
}

    private void initializeParameterTypes(List<MethodArgument> additionalParameters) {
        Iterable<Class<?>> classes = transform(additionalParameters, typeExtractor());
        int i = 0;
        for (Class<?> parameterClass : classes) {
            parameterTypes[i++] = parameterClass;
        }
    }

    @Test
    public void when_matching_mapping_constraints_then_controller_method_automatically_called() throws Exception {
        request.setMethod(httpMethod);
        request.setRequestURI(uri);
        annotationHandlerAdapter.handle(request, response, mockedController);

        Method method = MyController.class.getMethod(controllerMethod, parameterTypes);
        method.invoke(verify(mockedController), parameterValues);
    }
}

with the custom class MethodArgument that follows:

public class MethodArgument {
    private final Class<?> type;
    private final Object value;

    public MethodArgument(final Class<?> type, final Object value) {
        this.type = type;
        this.value = value;
    }

    public Object getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    public Class<?> getType() {
        return type;
    }

    public static Function<MethodArgument, Class<?>> typeExtractor() {
        return new Function<MethodArgument, Class<?>>() {
            @Override
            public Class<?> apply(MethodArgument argument) {
                return argument.getType();
            }
        };
    }

    public static Function<MethodArgument, Object> valueExtractor() {
        return new Function<MethodArgument, Object>() {
            @Override
            public Object apply(MethodArgument argument) {
                return argument.getValue();
            }
        };
    }
}

So, I'm almost there, the only test case here works because of Java Integer cache, and the Integer instance is therefore the same throughout the call chain... This however doesn't work with custom objects, I always end up with an InvocationTargetException (cause: "Argument(s) are different!")...

The types are correct but the passed instances are not identical to the ones set in the @Parameters method.

Any idea how to work around this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Hold your horses!

SpringSource is baking a spring-test-mvc module : https://github.com/SpringSource/spring-test-mvc

share|improve this answer
    
As I discussed with Piwai (I know him IRL ^^), my initial approach is wrong... testing that a given HTTP request is routed to a specific method is an implementation concern... Therefore, the most proper way to functionally test what I want is to send/simulate a real request and check the returned reply contents. In brief, I will accept this answer as this points me to the right direction :) –  Rolf Mar 1 '12 at 13:02
    
And I did not recognize you -_-' Hi! :) –  Rolf May 18 '12 at 13:06

It would be nice if instead of providing the example that works, you could provide the one that doesn't, and provide the stacktrace as well.

I quickly checked Google, it seems that Mockito doesn't handle well reflection on spy objects.

If you really wanna go along that road, there might be another way: providing the expected called method as part of your parameterized data, not by providing reflection data, but by actually calling the mock from there.

I'm writing that without any IDE at hand, so there might be compile errors, but you'll get the idea:

@RunWith(Parameterized.class)
public class MyControllerMappingTest {

    public interface VerifyCall<T> {
        void on(T controller);
    }

    @Parameters
    public static Collection<Object[]> requestMappings() {
        Object[][] testCases = {    
            {"GET", "/my/uri/0", new VerifyCall<MyController>() {
                @Override
                public void on(MyController controller) {
                    controller.index(0);
                }
            }}  
        };
        return asList(testCases);
    }

    private MockHttpServletRequest request;
    private MockHttpServletResponse response;
    private MyController mockedController;
    private AnnotationMethodHandlerAdapter annotationHandlerAdapter;

    private final String httpMethod;
    private final String uri;
    private final VerifyCall<MyController> verifyCall;

    public MyControllerMappingTest(String httpMethod, String uri, VerifyCall<MyController> verifyCall) {
        this.httpMethod = httpMethod;
        this.uri = uri;
        this.verifyCall = verifyCall;
    }

    @Before
    public void setup() {
        request = new MockHttpServletRequest();
        response = new MockHttpServletResponse();
        mockedController = mock(MyController.class);
        annotationHandlerAdapter = new AnnotationMethodHandlerAdapter();
    }

    @Test
    public void when_matching_mapping_constraints_then_controller_method_automatically_called() throws Exception {
        request.setMethod(httpMethod);
        request.setRequestURI(uri);
        annotationHandlerAdapter.handle(request, response, mockedController);

        verifyCall.on(verify(mockedController));
    }
}

Of course, having Java Lambas would help making this more readable.

You could also use FunkyJFunctional :

@RunWith(Parameterized.class)
public class MyControllerMappingTest {

    @Parameters
    public static Collection<Object[]> requestMappings() {
        class IndexZero extends FF<MyController, Void> {{ in.index(0); }}
        Object[][] testCases = { //           
                {"GET", "/my/uri/0", withF(IndexZero.clas)}

        };
        return asList(testCases);
    }

    private MockHttpServletRequest request;
    private MockHttpServletResponse response;
    private MyController mockedController;
    private AnnotationMethodHandlerAdapter annotationHandlerAdapter;

    private final String httpMethod;
    private final String uri;
    private final Function<MyController, Void> verifyCall;

    public MyControllerMappingTest(String httpMethod, String uri, Function<MyController, Void> verifyCall) {
        this.httpMethod = httpMethod;
        this.uri = uri;
        this.verifyCall = verifyCall;
    }

    @Before
    public void setup() {
        request = new MockHttpServletRequest();
        response = new MockHttpServletResponse();
        mockedController = mock(MyController.class);
        annotationHandlerAdapter = new AnnotationMethodHandlerAdapter();
    }

    @Test
    public void when_matching_mapping_constraints_then_controller_method_automatically_called() throws Exception {
        request.setMethod(httpMethod);
        request.setRequestURI(uri);
        annotationHandlerAdapter.handle(request, response, mockedController);

        verifyCall.apply(verify(mockedController));
    }
}

A few side notes:

  • For the sake of readability, it's a good practice to put your static members first in your class. Instance methods (setup()) should also go after the constructor.

  • Array syntax:

Instead of this syntax:

return asList(new Object[][] {
    {},
    {}
};

I find this syntax to be more readable:

Object[][] testCases = {
    {},
    {}
};
return asList(testCases);
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