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Why is the output of the following program just int3 and not int3&4?

#include <iostream>

class B
{
public:
    explicit B(int i) { std::cout<<"int"<<i; }
    B(const B& rhs, int i = 0) { std::cout<<"&"<<i; }
};

int main(int, char**)
{
    B b(B(3), 4);
}

Command: clang++ test.cpp -O0

Compiler: Apple clang version 3.0 (tags/Apple/clang-211.12) (based on LLVM 3.0svn)

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It prints int3&4 for me (GCC 4.6.2, -O3). –  Kerrek SB Feb 29 '12 at 22:32
    
Actually my g++ 4.6.1 does print "int3&4". –  Duck Feb 29 '12 at 22:32
1  
+1 for short, complete test case. sscce.org –  Robᵩ Mar 1 '12 at 1:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This was a bug in clang, which has since been fixed. Copy-elision was incorrectly being applied to the constructor call, because clang wasn't checking how many arguments were provided before concluding that it was a copy construction.

The fix will be in the upcoming clang 3.1 release.

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Looks like you might have found a compiler quirk :)

If you change your compiler version to anything that's not LLVM 3.0, the output is int3&4.

This prints int3&4 on LLVm 3.0, so it seems to be related to the fact that B(3) is a temporary object:

class B
{
public:
    explicit B(int i)
    { 
        std::cout<<"int"<<i; 
    }
    B(const B& rhs, int i = 0) 
    { 
        std::cout<<"&"<<i; 
    }
};

int main(int, char**)
{
    B a(3);
    B b(a, 4);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this was a bug in clang, which has since been fixed. Copy-elision was incorrectly being applied to the constructor call, because clang wasn't checking how many arguments were provided before concluding that it was a copy construction. –  Richard Smith Mar 21 '12 at 5:32
    
@RichardSmith Can you post this comment as an answer? –  David Lin Apr 1 '12 at 18:02

Most likely, RVO and NRVO ate your code. These special conditions allow the compiler to silently eliminate object copies that would otherwise be enforced by the language. Since no copy was ever made as a result, then the code never prints the statement in the copy constructor.

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Would RVO and NRVO be allowed even in Debug mode? As I understand it, they are optimizations and hence should be disabled when running in Debug mode, but in Debug mode I get "int3" too, on LLVM 3.0 –  Carl Mar 1 '12 at 0:25
    
Just thought I'd add this: stackoverflow.com/questions/8556608/…. Apparently, some compilers do selectively implement RVO and/or NRVO in debug mode too, which would explain LLVM's behaviour. –  Carl Mar 1 '12 at 0:28
    
@carleeto: The compiler can legally do it whenever it likes. –  Puppy Mar 2 '12 at 23:56

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