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I am implementing a task runtime system that maintains buffers for user-provided objects of various types. In addition, all objects are wrapped before they are stored into the buffers. Since the runtime doesn't know the types of objects that the user will provide, the Wrapper and the Buffer classes are templated:

template <typename T>
class Wrapper {
private:
    T mdata;
public:
    Wrapper() = default;
    Wrapper(T& user_data) : mdata(user_data) {}
    T& GetData() { return mdata; }
    ...
};

template <typename T> 
class Buffer {
private:
    std::deque<Wrapper<T>> items;
public:
    void Write(Wrapper<T> wd) {
        items.push_back(wd);
    }

    Wrapper<T> Read() {
        Wrapper<T> tmp = items.front();
        items.pop_front();
        return tmp;
    }
    ...
};

Now, the runtime system handles the tasks, each of which operates on a subset of aforementioned buffers. Thus, each buffer is operated by one or more tasks. This means that a task must keep references to the buffers since the tasks may share buffers.

This is where my problem is: 1) each task needs to keep references to a number of buffers (this number is unknown in compile time) 2) the buffers are of different types (based on the templeted Buffer class). 3) the task needs to use these references to access buffers.

There is no point to have a base class to the Buffer class and then use base class pointers since the methods Write and Read from the Buffer class are templeted and thus cannot be virtual.

So I was thinking to keep references as void pointers, where the Task class would look something like:

class Task {
private:
    vector<void *> buffers;
public:
    template<typename T>
    void AddBuffer(Buffet<T>* bptr) {
        buffers.push_back((void *) bptr);
    }

    template<typename T>
    Buffer<T>* GetBufferPtr(int index) {
        return some_way_of_cast(buffers[index]);
    }
    ...
};

The problem with this is that I don't know how to get the valid pointer from the void pointer in order to access the Buffer. Namely, I don't know how to retain the type of the object pointed by buffers[index].

Can you help me with this, or suggest some other solution?

EDIT: The buffers are only the implementation detail of the runtime system and the user is not aware of their existence.

share|improve this question
    
Hmm, I think this won't work well with templates – too much runtime polymorphism needed. I'd suggest two options off my head: 1. Use subtype polymorphism everywhere and have the user inherit his types from some common abstract base class that provides everything the Task class needs. 2. Boost.Any. But neither is really satisfactory. –  Philipp Feb 29 '12 at 22:41
    
@Philipp As I intended the system to work, the user should write a program that differs from the regular program only in that he defines task regions and declares which variables are of special interest to each task. Those variables should be wrapped using Wrapper<T> template, which would support optional compile-time and/or runtime checks. Thus, I wouldn't like to force the user to complicate its code further. Instead i would like to hide it. And for the time being, I would like to avoid Boost. –  Diggy Mar 1 '12 at 0:47
    
@perreal Basically, when the task starts executing it should acquire a single object from each of the associated buffers. For example, some_way_of_cast in the GetBufferPtr function. The runtime should't care about the data itself, but I guess the problem is that I have an arbitrary number of buffer references, and each buffer stores arbitrary type of data. I am looking for a way to encode this in the task class. –  Diggy Mar 1 '12 at 0:55
    
@Diggy, I still don't understand why it is not possible to do the cast at the caller end of the GetBufferPtr() function, make it return (char*). –  perreal Mar 1 '12 at 0:57
    
@perreal It is possible, but I was hoping that I can do it in a way I described which would allow the data to be manipulated and returned to the user possibly in a more suitable form. –  Diggy Mar 1 '12 at 1:17

3 Answers 3

In my experience, when the user types are kept in user code, run-time systems handling buffers do not need to worry about the actual type of these buffer. Users can invoke operations on typed buffers.

    class Task {
    private:
        vector<void *> buffers;
    public:
        void AddBuffer(char* bptr) {
            buffers.push_back((void *) bptr);
        }

        char *GetBufferPtr(int index) {
            return some_way_of_cast(buffers[index]);
        }
        ...
    };

  class RTTask: public Task {
  /* ... */
  void do_stuff() {
     Buffer<UserType1> b1; b1Id = b1.id();
     Buffer<UserType2> b2; b2Id = b2.id();

     AddBuffer(cast(&b1));
     AddBuffer(cast(&b2));
  }
  void do_stuff2() {
    Buffer<UserType1> *b1 = cast(GetBufferPtr(b1Id));
    b1->push(new UserType1());
  }
};

In these cases casts are in the user code. But perhaps you have a different problem. Also the Wrapper class may not be necessary if you can switch to pointers.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, the user is not aware of buffers.He only sees Wrapper<T> template and uses it to distinguish variables which have a "special" role in the system that I am building. I will edit my question to clarify this. –  Diggy Mar 1 '12 at 0:31

What you need is something called type erasure. It's way to hide the type(s) in a template.

The basic technique is the following: - Have an abstract class with the behavior you want in declared in a type independent maner. - Derive your template class from that class, implement its virtual methods.

Good news, you probably don't need to write your own, there boost::any already. Since all you need is get a pointer and get the object back, that should be enough.

Now, working with void* is a bad idea. As perreal mentioned, the code dealing with the buffers should not care about the type though. The good thing to do is to work with char*. That is the type that is commonly used for buffers (e.g. socket apis). It is safer than too: there is a special rule in the standard that allows safer conversion to char* (see aliasing rules).

share|improve this answer
    
"Derive your template class from that class, implement its virtual methods." - but my methods are templated and so cannot be virtual. Is there a way to work around this. If so, could you provide an example. –  Diggy Mar 1 '12 at 1:07
    
You could have a non virtual templated method in the base class that would call the a virtual non templated method. –  J.N. Mar 1 '12 at 2:26

This isn't exactly an answer to your question, but I just wanted to point out that the way you wrote

Wrapper<T> Read() { 

makes it a mutator member function which returns by value, and as such, is not good practice as it forces the user write exception unsafe code.

For the same reason the STL stack::pop() member function returns void, not the object that was popped off the stack.

share|improve this answer
    
That is a valid point, but, as you noted, isn't an answer, using a comment is more appropriate. –  J.N. Feb 29 '12 at 23:55

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