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I'm trying to work out the arctan of a number using the formula:

arctan(x) = x - x^3/3 + x^5/5 - x^7/7...

I have to calculate it to 20 decimal places. The answer should be 0.78539....

This is the code I have written, including some debugging statements. The problem is in the calculation I think but I just can't see it. Could someone point me in the right direction please?

EDIT : Can't use the atan function, has to be manually calculated using a double variable from user input.

#include <iomanip>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
using namespace std;

int main(void)
{
 double x;
 int i;
 int j;
 int y=3;

  cout<<"Please enter the number you wish to calculate the arctan of:"<<endl;
  cin>>x;

   //Calculate arctan of this number
   cout<<x;
   cout<<"\n";
   cout<<y;
   cout<<"\n";

   cout<<"Start\n";

   x=x-(pow(x,y)/y);
   y=y+2;
   cout <<  setprecision (20) << x;
   cout<<"=x before loop\n";
   cout<<y;
   cout<<"=y before loop\n";

   for(i=0;i<9;i++)
    {
     x=x+(pow(x,y)/y);
      cout<<x;
      cout<<"=x1 in loop\n";
     y=y+2;
      cout<<y;
      cout<<"=y1 in loop\n";

     x-(pow(x,y)/y);
      cout<<x;
      cout<<"=x2 in loop\n";
     y=y+2; 
      cout<<y;
      cout<<"=y2 in loop\n";
    }
return 0;

}
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1  
You're not going to get 20 digits of precision out of native floating-point types. –  Mysticial Feb 29 '12 at 22:42
    
What's the problem with the output? Does it simply fail to give the correct answer? –  Anton Feb 29 '12 at 22:42
    
The output is giving me 0.69..... no matter how many times the loop runs, I think it's the structure of the loop causing the problem –  adohertyd Feb 29 '12 at 22:44
    
You should also be aware of how slowly the series converges... (if at all) –  Mysticial Feb 29 '12 at 22:45
    
Mystical, could you please elaborate a little on those points? Not quite sure what you mean –  adohertyd Feb 29 '12 at 22:48
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, your x is changing! You probably want to use a different variable to store the value computed so far and the argument to your function. That said, don't expect to precise outputs because all those computations involve rounding.

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Based on your advice I changed the variable. Getting the correct output now, to a point anyway. It's correct up to about 5 decimal places will have to do. Thanks! –  adohertyd Mar 3 '12 at 3:14
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This line:

 x-(pow(x,y)/y);

might have something to do with your problem.

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Since this is homework, I love this answer. –  Johan Lundberg Feb 29 '12 at 23:01
    
Yeah this really helps :) haha! –  adohertyd Feb 29 '12 at 23:03
1  
Okay, if you must have a better clue: it's missing a =. –  Robᵩ Mar 1 '12 at 0:10
    
Sorry to be so late coming back on this. Found the error you spotted. Thanks for that! Still not giving me the expected output though but I think it's down to the use of the Double etc. Thanks for the help –  adohertyd Mar 3 '12 at 1:56
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I would strong advise you use the inbuilt atan function, it is more than likely been well optimised for you architecture, as well as being a standard function recognised by most C++ programmers.

#include <cmath>
#include <iostream>    

int main()
{
    double d;
    std::cout << "enter number" << std::endl;
    std::cin  >> d;
    std::cout << "atan of: " << d 
              << " is "      << std::atan(d) 
              << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
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2  
"I'm trying to work out the arctan of a number using the formula:..." How is this help to his homework question? –  Johan Lundberg Feb 29 '12 at 23:03
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I agree with @Mystical. I don't think you're going to get 20 digits of precision out of a double. I think you need a long double (if that exists on your system) or, perhaps you need to implement your own big-num class...

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Fair point and thanks for the input but I'm not even at that point of the problem yet. Have to get the calculation correct before worrying about the precision of it. We were told to use a double so that's why I've gone with it –  adohertyd Feb 29 '12 at 22:56
    
This is definitely true. The mantissa of an IEEE double is 52 bits. That means that it can at most represent ~4.5 * 10^15 different values. This means that at the very most, a double could hold enough information to allow for 14 of the digits to be correct. –  Alderath Mar 2 '12 at 10:17
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