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I have a class with an accessor member function that I want to call and apply the result to a functor using std::for_each. I have a working version below that uses a for loop and for_each, but the for_each version is cryptic and cumbersome. Is there a way I can make the for_each version more concise, considering I have access to boost, but not C++11?

#if 0
   // for loop version:
   for(value_vector_type::iterator it = values.begin(); it!=values.end(); it++){
     avg(it->getValue());  // I want to put this in a for_each loop
   }
#else
  //  bind version:
  std::for_each(values.begin(), values.end(), // iterate over all values
    boost::bind(
      boost::mem_fn(&average_type::operator()), // attach the averaging functor to the output of the getvalue call
      &avg, 
      boost::bind(
        boost::mem_fn(&value_wrapper_type::getValue), // bind the getValue call to each element in values
        _1
      )
    )
  );
#endif    

Here is the full working implementation:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/bind/mem_fn.hpp>

// A value wrapper
template<typename T>
struct Value {
  Value(){}
  Value(const T& value, bool valid = true):m_value(value),m_valid(valid){}

  T getValue(){ return m_value; }
  bool getValid(){ return m_valid; }
  void setValue(const T& value){ m_value = value; }
  void setValid(const T& valid){ m_valid = valid; }

private:
  T m_value;
  bool m_valid;   
};

// Class that calculates the average piecewise
template<typename T>
struct Average {
private:
    T m_numPoints;
    T m_ChannelSum;

public:

    Average() : m_numPoints(0), m_ChannelSum(0.0){}

    void operator()(T value){
        m_numPoints++;
        m_ChannelSum+=value;
    }

    double getAverage(){ return m_ChannelSum/m_numPoints; }
    T getCount(){ return m_numPoints; }
    T getSum(){ return m_ChannelSum; }
};

// Run the average computation on several values
int main(int argc, char** argv){
  typedef int value_type;
  typedef Value<value_type> value_wrapper_type;
  typedef std::vector<value_wrapper_type> value_vector_type;
  value_vector_type values;
  values.push_back(value_wrapper_type(5));
  values.push_back(value_wrapper_type(7));
  values.push_back(value_wrapper_type(3));
  values.push_back(value_wrapper_type(1));
  values.push_back(value_wrapper_type(2));

  typedef Average<value_type> average_type;
  average_type avg;

#if 0
   // for loop version:
   for(value_vector_type::iterator it = values.begin(); it!=values.end(); it++){
     avg(it->getValue());  // I want to put this in a for_each loop
   }
#else
  //  bind version:
  std::for_each(values.begin(), values.end(), // iterate over all values
    boost::bind(
      boost::mem_fn(&average_type::operator()), // attach the averaging functor to the output of the getvalue call
      &avg, 
      boost::bind(
        boost::mem_fn(&value_wrapper_type::getValue), // bind the getValue call to each element in values
        _1
      )
    )
  );
#endif    
  std::cout << "Average: " << avg.getAverage() << " Count: " << avg.getCount() << " Sum: " << avg.getSum() << std::endl;
}

note: my original question was how to construct a for_each at all, but I've found that solution and a whole new question did not make much sense.

Thanks, all help is really appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
Why? What does this accomplish that std::accumulate(values.begin(), values.end())/values.size(); wouldn't do? –  Jerry Coffin Feb 29 '12 at 23:28
    
@JerryCoffin Averaging is a simplified problem that extracts the essence of my actual problem, which is binding a member function to a functor in a for_each loop. –  Andrew Hundt Mar 1 '12 at 1:42
    
My point was also meant to be broader -- that I think you're taking the wrong approach, and you'd be better off asking about what you're really trying to accomplish here, not the details of the (probably wrong, IMO) path you've started to take toward accomplishing that. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 1 '12 at 16:31
    
@JerryCoffin I agree it may not turn out to be the best approach, but it is certainly beneficial to learn some of the intricacies of C++. –  Andrew Hundt Mar 1 '12 at 16:42

5 Answers 5

If you don't have C++11 but Boost you could try a bind() expression (which would also work with C++2011 as bind() is part of C++2011):

std::for_each(a.begin(), a.end(), bind(&avg<value_type>, bind(&Value<value_type>::getValue, _1)));
share|improve this answer
1  
I think that needs to be bind(avg,bind(&Value<value_type>::getValue,_1)). –  Joe Gauterin Feb 29 '12 at 22:51
    
Er, yes: I didn't notice that Value is a template. In addition, it may be necessary to take the address of avg in addition to specifying the template argument. I'll update the answer... –  Dietmar Kühl Feb 29 '12 at 23:01
    
This didn't work, but gave me a hint for finding a working solution. I'm hopeful that there is a simpler way than my version though so I modified the question and I am keeping it open for now. –  Andrew Hundt Mar 1 '12 at 1:35

if you are using c++11 then you can try

for(auto& a: values)
    avg(a->getValue());

or

std::for_each(a.begin(), a.end(), [](whatever_type& wt){
    avg(wt->getValue());
});

If you are not, then I think that toy have as good as your going to get although formatting wont hurt.

for(value_vector_type::iterator it = values.begin(); 
    it!=values.end(); 
    ++it)
{
    avg(it.getValue());  // I want to put this in a for_each loop
}

Trying to be too clever with function object and the like can often have the inverse effect of obscuring your code.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's usually a good idea to increment iterators with the prefix increment operator, as ++it. –  Greg Hewgill Feb 29 '12 at 23:03
    
@GregHewgill agrees I Didn't see that. fixed –  111111 Feb 29 '12 at 23:18
    
also the -> should be . (a and wt are references not iterators) –  Philipp Feb 29 '12 at 23:27
1  
@NicolBolas: and what part of "edited 11 hours" don't you understand, that addition to his question was added 3 hours after I made my reply -- i didn't have that knowledge. –  111111 Mar 1 '12 at 13:25

One way to make it look neater is to use Boost.Phoenix. You can shorten down to this:

std::for_each(values.begin(), values.end(), lazy(avg)(arg1.getValue()));

Heres how to do that. First thing you need to do is make the avg function object lazy. The simplest way to that is in-place with a function, defined like this:

template<class Function>
function<Function> lazy(Function x)
{
    return function<Function>(x);
}

Next thing you need to do is write a function object for getValue, that can be lazy, like this:

struct get_value_impl
{
    // result_of protocol:
    template <typename Sig>
    struct result;

    template <typename This, typename T>
    struct result<This(Value<T>&)>
    {
        // The result will be T
        typedef typename T type;
    };

    template <typename V>
    typename result<get_value_impl(V &)>::type
    operator()(V & value) const
    {
        return value.getValue();
    }
};

Thirdly, we extend the phoenix actors, using our get_value_impl class, so it will have a getValue method, like this:

template <typename Expr>
struct value_actor
    : actor<Expr>
{
    typedef actor<Expr> base_type;
    typedef value_actor<Expr> that_type;

    value_actor( base_type const& base )
        : base_type( base ) {}

    typename expression::function<get_value_impl, that_type>::type const
    getValue() const
    {
        function<get_value_impl> const f = get_value_impl();
        return f(*this);
    }
};

Finally, we put it all together by defining the argument and passing it into the for_each algorithm:

expression::terminal<phoenix::argument<1>, value_actor>  arg1;
std::for_each(values.begin(), values.end(), lazy(avg)(arg1.getValue()));
share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting technique. I will have to take some time to understand Boost.Phoenix. Thanks! –  Andrew Hundt Mar 5 '12 at 19:02
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Credit goes to Mathias Gaunard on the boost.users mailing list for pointing me towards this solution:

  std::for_each(values.begin(), values.end(),
    boost::bind(boost::ref(avg), boost::bind(&value_wrapper_type::getValue, _1))
  );

Wrapping avg with boost::ref is required because otherwise a copy of avg is filled out with the results of getValue(), rather than avg itself.

Here is the full compiled and tested solution:

#include <stdexcept>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/bind/mem_fn.hpp>

// A value wrapper
template<typename T>
struct Value {
  Value(){}
  Value(const T& value, bool valid = true):m_value(value),m_valid(valid){}

  T getValue(){ return m_value; }
  bool getValid(){ return m_valid; }
  void setValue(const T& value){ m_value = value; }
  void setValid(const T& valid){ m_valid = valid; }

private:
  T m_value;
  bool m_valid;   
};

// Class that calculates the average piecewise
template<typename T>
struct Average {
private:
    T m_numPoints;
    T m_ChannelSum;

public:
  typedef void result_type;

    Average() : m_numPoints(0), m_ChannelSum(0.0){}

    result_type operator()(T value){
        m_numPoints++;
        m_ChannelSum+=value;
    }

    double getAverage(){ 
    if (m_ChannelSum==0) {
      throw std::logic_error("Cannot get average of zero values");
    }

    return m_ChannelSum/m_numPoints; 
  }
    T getCount(){ return m_numPoints; }
    T getSum(){ return m_ChannelSum; }
};

// Run the average computation on several values
int main(int argc, char** argv){
  typedef int value_type;
  typedef Value<value_type> value_wrapper_type;
  typedef std::vector<value_wrapper_type> value_vector_type;
  value_vector_type values;
  values.push_back(value_wrapper_type(5));
  values.push_back(value_wrapper_type(7));
  values.push_back(value_wrapper_type(3));
  values.push_back(value_wrapper_type(1)); 
  values.push_back(value_wrapper_type(2));

  typedef Average<value_type> average_type;
  average_type avg;

#if 0
  // for loop version:
  for(value_vector_type::iterator it = values.begin(); it!=values.end(); it++){
   avg(it->getValue());  // I want to put this in a for_each loop
  }
#else
  //  bind version:
  std::for_each(values.begin(), values.end(),
    boost::bind(boost::ref(avg), boost::bind(&value_wrapper_type::getValue, _1))
  );
#endif    
  std::cout << "Average: " << avg.getAverage() << " Count: " << avg.getCount() << " Sum: " << avg.getSum() << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer

If you can use boost, but not C++11 features, then I would consider using the BOOST_FOREACH macro

Yes, it's a macro, but as macros go it's well behaved

It's also reads quite nicely and is hard to get wrong

BOOST_FOREACH(const Value& rValue, values)
{
    avg(rValue.getValue());
}

C++11 range based for loops will replace it

share|improve this answer

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