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i want to know what is the right way to do it .

We have area which can be northamerica, southamerica

we have goelocations which can be slc, murry, peru, mexico

so, one area can have many geolocations.

table for this is

ID      Area    Geolocation  
1       NA      slc  
2       NA      murry  
3       SA      peru  
4       SA      mexico  

If number of area and geolocation are very limited and not expected to grow do you see a problem in this type of design vs table with FK like below

Area table

ID      Area  
1       NA  
2       SA  

Geolocation table

ID    Geolocation     AreaID  
1       slc            1  
2       mexico         2  
3       peru           2  

which one will be easy to query and use in a php application?

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thanks for the help .. the AREA and GEOLOCATIONS are not growing and are static(data will never be added to these tables.) which one is the best way to design the table with or with out foreign keys and why and why not. –  sid Feb 29 '12 at 23:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Even though denormalization doesn't cost a lot because, as you say, the geolocation set is small and stable, it's still worth having a normalized table (as with your second option). You may decide to add (say) centralamerica or other regions. Or you may need to change the encoding used. The whole point of normalization is to make it easier to deal with changes you did not expect, not just the ones you can foresee.

The performance penalty for lookups is very small (if there is any at all). Updates will be easier and the data base will probably be smaller with an FK-based schema.

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It depends on your requirements, if you want more flexibility you could have two lookup tables (Area and Geolocation) and a 'mapping' table where you create different configurations of area/geolocation.

That would give you more flexibility to do different mappings without affecting existing data, though looking at the data you probably don't require it in this case.

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Sounds like a simple one-to-many relationship between the AREA and GEOLOCATION tables. Any relational database could handle such a thing. Add a foreign key to GEOLOCATION that points back to the AREA primary key and you're in business. Don't forget to add an index to the GEOLOCATION foreign key column.

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thanks for the help .. the AREA and GEOLOCATIONS are not growing and are static(data will never be added to these tables.) which one is the best way to design the table with or with out foreign keys and why and why not. –  sid Feb 29 '12 at 23:39
    
I think I've made it clear: with foreign keys. You want the referential integrity and normalization. –  duffymo Feb 29 '12 at 23:40
    
I think you're missing OP's question. He knows about foreign keys and is asking about the pros and cons of a denormalized schema under the stated assumptions. –  Ted Hopp Feb 29 '12 at 23:45
    
I get it. I voted for foreign keys and normalization. –  duffymo Mar 1 '12 at 0:18

This is denormalization and is fine. My rule for denormalization is, if I have a reason, it's enough of a reason. So, as long as you have a reason for such denormalization, then proceed.

The above design is not likely to make your queries more complicated. In fact, it might simplify them. It's just not optimized for asking questions like "What are the areas?"

Instead of this (normalized):

SELECT *
FROM areas

You have to do this (denormalized):

SELECT DISTINCT area
FROM geolocation

And what if there are areas that don't have a row in geolocation yet? How will you know about them?

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A view can make the queries as simple for the normalized schema as for the denormalized one. I don't see any other reasons for denormalization in this case. –  Ted Hopp Feb 29 '12 at 23:48
    
@TedHopp, good point, not considering performance, of course. –  Marcus Adams Feb 29 '12 at 23:52

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