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Consider the following example:

class MyContainer {
    std::vector<void *> v;
public:
    void Put(void *x) { v.push_back(x);}
    void* Get(int index) { return v[index];}
};

void Work (MyContainer& c) {
    // cast_to_type(c.Get(0));
}

int main() {
    int x = 1;
    double y = 2.0;
    MyContainer c;
    c.Put(&x);
    c.Put(&y);

    Work(c);

    return 0;
}

Assume that function Work knows nothing about the objects to which vector pointers point to. Also assume that inheritance is not an option and that types of the pointed objects can be arbitrary (there can be infinite number of types).

Is it possible to deduce the type using only the void pointer returned by MyContainer::Get function? Can this be done using any combination of casts, templates and typeid operator?

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6  
Short answer: no. –  Chris Lutz Mar 1 '12 at 2:56
    
What if I use templates to wrap objects, and then put pointers to wrapped objects? Can I use templates to somehow save the information about the type? –  Diggy Mar 1 '12 at 3:06
    
@Diggy: Not directly, but you can now apply inheritance through this wrapper. See boost::any. –  Xeo Mar 1 '12 at 3:07
    
@Diggy - Yes, but then you're not really using void * pointers. void * implies that it can point to literally anything. And anyway, any template solution you use will end up reinventing boost::any or something similar. –  Chris Lutz Mar 1 '12 at 3:08
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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No, void*s have absolutely no information associated with them whatsoever, and when you cast a pointer to a void*, you lose the type completely. You'll have to find another way to store different types in the same container, such as with inheritance.

You could also do something like this:

class MyContainer {
    struct cont {
        void* ptr;
        type_info* ti; // pointer, not reference, so this struct can be copied
    };

    std::vector<cont> v;

public:
    template<typename T>
    void Put(T* x) {
        v.push_back({ x, &typeid(T) });
    }

    // do whatever you want with Get using *v[x].ti
};

int x = 1;
double y = 2.0;
MyContainer c;
c.Put(&x);
c.Put(&y);

Work(c);

But I don't know how much help that would be without knowing what you are trying to do. You might have to resort to something a little more advanced like boost::any.

share|improve this answer
    
You were faster than my edit :). What if inheritance is impossible. –  Diggy Mar 1 '12 at 3:03
    
@Diggy see my edit –  Seth Carnegie Mar 1 '12 at 3:10
    
Unfortunately, I can't use type_info to recast my void pointer to a proper type. See Typecasting_with_type_info. So this still is not a solution to my question. –  Diggy Mar 1 '12 at 18:22
    
@Diggy then unfortunately there is no solution; C++ doesn't have the facilities to do what you want (aside from, as I said, using something like boost::any). Perhaps if you could tell us what you're trying to do? –  Seth Carnegie Mar 1 '12 at 22:56
    
Thanks for the answer Seth. boost::any doesn't really solve this problem either. It does enable storing different objects into a single container, i.e. std::vector, which is good. Additionally, it provides support for casting encapsulated object into the proper type, though again you have to know the type to call casting methods. It seems that there is no solution to this question, so even though your answer is useful, I cannot accept it as a definite answer. –  Diggy Mar 5 '12 at 19:00
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