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I need to sort a PostgreSQL table ascending by a date/time field, e.g. last_updated.

But that field is allowed to be empty or null and I want records with null in last_updated come before non-null last_updated.
Is this possible?

order by last_updated asc /* and null last_updated records first ?? */
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just in case needed: postgresql.org/docs/9.0/static/queries-order.html –  mhd Mar 1 '12 at 6:42
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2 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

PostgreSQL provides the NULLS FIRST | LAST keywords for the ORDER BY clause to cater for that need exactly:

ORDER BY last_updated NULLS FIRST
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didn't find that before, my google-fu is not that great. Tnx –  mhd Mar 1 '12 at 6:42
1  
@mhd You didn't Google for "postgres sort null first"? –  David Aldridge Mar 29 '13 at 14:33
2  
I did. That's how I got this page :) –  ibrewster Jul 22 '13 at 20:09
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You can create a custom ORDER BY using a CASE statement.
The CASE statement checks for your condition and assigns to rows which meet that condition a lower value than that which is assigned to rows which do not meet the condition.
It's probably easiest to understand given an example:

  SELECT last_updated 
    FROM your_table 
ORDER BY CASE WHEN last_updated IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END, 
         last_updated ASC;
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Also, but you probably know this, ASC is the default sorting order so you do not necessarily need to type it. –  bernie Mar 1 '12 at 4:29
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That is a pretty complicated way of writing NULLS FIRST... –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 29 '13 at 15:02
    
Agreed. It is also an ANSI-compliant way of writing NULLS FIRST. –  bernie Mar 29 '13 at 15:27
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