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I recently got stuck in a situation like this:

class A
{
public:
    typedef struct/class {...} B;
...
    C::D *someField;
}

class C
{
public:
    typedef struct/class {...} D;
...
    A::B *someField;
}

Usually you can declare a class name:

class A;

But you can't forward declare a nested type, the following causes compilation error.

class C::D;

Any ideas?

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4  
Why do you need that? Note that you can forward declare if it's a member of the same class being defined: class X { class Y; Y *a; }; class X::Y { }; –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 4 '09 at 15:33
1  
Fascinating error. –  Paul Nathan Jun 4 '09 at 15:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 91 down vote accepted

You can't do it, it's a hole in the C++ language. You'll have to un-nest at least one of the nested classes.

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2  
Thanks for the answer. In my case, they're not my nested classes. I was hoping to avoid a huge library header file dependency with a little forward reference. I wonder if C++11 fixed it? –  Marsh Ray Nov 7 '11 at 0:57
15  
Oh. Just what I didn't want google to show up. Thanks anyway for the concise answer. –  learnvst Jan 11 '12 at 22:44
7  
Same here ... does someone know why it is not possible ? It seems there is valid use cases, and this lack prevents architecture consistency in some situations. –  Maël Nison Nov 1 '12 at 16:10
class IDontControl
{
    class Nested
    {
        Nested(int i);
    };
};

I needed a forward reference like:

class IDontControl::Nested; // But this doesn't work.

My workaround was:

class IDontControl_Nested; // Forward reference to distinct name.

Later when I could use the full definition:

#include <idontcontrol.h>

// I defined the forward ref like this:
class IDontControl_Nested : public IDontControl::Nested
{
    // Needed to make a forwarding constructor here
    IDontControl_Nested(int i) : Nested(i) { }
};

This technique would probably be more trouble than it's worth if there were complicated constructors or other special member functions that weren't inherited smoothly. I could imagine certain template magic reacting badly.

But in my very simple case, it seems to work.

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1  
In C++11 you can inherit constructors by using basename::basename; in the derived class, thus no problem with complicated ctors. –  Xeo Nov 7 '11 at 1:27
    
+1 for ingenuity. –  namezero Jan 15 at 23:56

If you really want to avoid #including the nasty header file in your header file, you could do this:

hpp file:

class MyClass
{
public:
    template<typename ThrowAway>
    void doesStuff();
};

cpp file

#include "MyClass.hpp"
#include "Annoying-3rd-party.hpp"

template<> void MyClass::doesStuff<This::Is::An::Embedded::Type>()
{
    // ...
}

But then:

  1. you will have to specify the embedded type at call time (especially if your function does not take any parameters of the embedded type)
  2. your function can not be virtual (because it is a template)

So, yeah, tradeoffs...

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What the heck is an hpp file? –  Neal Apr 16 '12 at 12:58
    
lol, an .hpp header file is used in C++ projects to distinguish it from a C header file which typically ends with .h. When working with C++ and C in the same project some people prefer .hpp and .cpp for C++ files, to make it explicitly with what type of files their dealing with, and .h and .c for C files. –  dZkF9RWJT6wN8ux Dec 3 '12 at 14:16

I would not call this an answer, but nonetheless an interesting find: If you repeat the declaration of your struct in a namespace called C, everything is fine (in gcc at least). When the class definition of C is found, it seems to silently overwrite the namspace C.

namespace C {
    typedef struct {} D;
}

class A
{
public:
 typedef struct/class {...} B;
...
C::D *someField;
}

class C
{
public:
   typedef struct/class {...} D;
...
   A::B *someField;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this with cygwin gcc and it doesn't compile if you try to reference A.someField. C::D in the class A definition actually refers the the (empty) struct in the namespace, not the struct in the class C (BTW this doesn't compile in MSVC) –  Dolphin Jun 4 '09 at 16:44
    
It gives the error: "'class C' redeclared as different kind of symbol" –  Calmarius Jun 4 '09 at 16:53
5  
Looks like a GCC bug. It seems to think a namespace name can hide a class name in the same scope. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 4 '09 at 17:32

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