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This is the code :

// link 1 handler. This must finish in any case before link2 starts
$('#link1').click(function () {
    console.log("First Handler");
    setTimeout(function() {
        console.log("Thread???");
    }, 2000);   
});

// link 2 handler. It starts only when block code of link1's handler finish
$('#link2').click(function () {
    console.log("Second Handler");    
});    

$('#link1').click();
$('#link2').click();

clicking, in sequence, on link1 and link2, means (for what I understand) that block code of link2's handler can't start before link1's handler finish (because JS is single thread, and system events is synchronous).

Well, so, why about console.log("Thread???"); that will be printed after 2sec? I see it such as a thread. Also, the behaviour it's the same...

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3  
Asynchronous != multi-threaded –  Vahur Roosimaa Mar 1 '12 at 8:49

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When the handler is fired for link1, it runs the entire function, including the setTimeout function that merely registers the function that runs your console.log("Thread???") statement. This happens very quickly. Think of this like you would cocking a firearm. You haven't fired, you've just prepared to fire and are performing a 2 second countdown.

In other words, the setTimeout function does not block the execution of any other functions and (emphasis added) does not force link2 to wait. As far as link1's handler is concerned, it did it's job, and the JavaScript engine proceeds to execute link2's handler, which also finishes well before your 2000ms event fires.

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Good answer that describes well what happens in this example! –  awe Mar 1 '12 at 9:15
    
"In other words, the setTimeout function does not block the execution of any other functions and force link2 to wait" ? NO! link2 doesnt wait that setTimeout of link1 is performed! –  markzzz Mar 1 '12 at 13:08
    
@markzzz - I'm not sure I understand. Can you clarify? –  jmort253 Mar 1 '12 at 23:29
    
I misunderstand! Clear :) –  markzzz Mar 2 '12 at 15:15

Single-threaded? Yes!! The explanation is far too comprehensive for a short answer here and has been covered before. See this fantastic article: John Resig - How JavaScript Timers Work

Edited: Because there is no exception to the "Yes!!" :-)

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Great article! Events and timers execute in between when nothing else blocks execution. Based on this, you are only guaranteed a timer executing on time if nothing else occupies the thread on the time of scheduled execution. –  awe Mar 1 '12 at 9:08

Javascript is single-thread but code execution can be asynchronous.

here is the execution order:

link1 clicked -> link2 clicked -> link1 handler executed -> link2 handler executed -> waiting for less than 2 seconds -> link1 setTimeout event handler logic executed
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Shouldn't link1's handler fire first since it's the first one in the sequence? I'm not asking about the contents of the setTimeout but the console.log("First") and the actual registering of the event. –  jmort253 Mar 1 '12 at 8:39
    
Sorry link1's handler is fired first but got suspended by setTimeout method, so the real logic is executed lastly. –  Mike Lin Mar 1 '12 at 8:43
    
Awesome. Go ahead and edit and fix your answer and I'll get rid of my downvote :) –  jmort253 Mar 1 '12 at 8:46
    
Updated, thanks. –  Mike Lin Mar 1 '12 at 8:48
    
Uhm...I dubt this order! In fact, link2 handler executed -> waiting for less than 2 seconds -> is true? I don't think setTimeout wait the finish of link2 handler. It starts during the execution of the block code of link2 handler... –  markzzz Mar 1 '12 at 13:05

I think I can try to sum it up.

There is a circular que and the timers are given a moment to be evaluated at the start/end (kind of the same thing) to be checked and fire their events.

This may seem like a silly answer but it is conceptually correct.

I guarantee armed with this concept you can implement your own version inside of a carefully crafted while loop. Just don`t over think it =)

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If you want to work with threads in java script you can use the WebWorker object of HTML5. See the article of John Resig about WebWorkers http://ejohn.org/blog/web-workers/

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1  
This doesn't really answer the question the op is asking, but it is good to know JS engines are becoming more advanced in more modern browsers. –  jmort253 Mar 1 '12 at 8:45

I thing this help u!!!

HTML

<input type="button" value="click me">
<input type="text">

first Coding ;

<script>
  var button = document.body.children[0]
  var text = document.body.children[1]

 button.onclick = function() {
    alert('in onclick')

    text.focus()

    alert('out onclick')
  }

  text.onfocus = function() {
    alert('onfocus') 
    text.onfocus = null  //(*)
  }
</script>

Second coding;

<script>
  var button = document.body.children[0]
  var text = document.body.children[1]

 /* button.onclick = function() {
    alert('in onclick')

    text.focus()

    alert('out onclick')
  }*/

  text.onfocus = function() {
    alert('onfocus') 
    text.onfocus = null  //(*)
  }
  button.onclick = function() {
      alert(1)
      setTimeout(function() { text.focus() }, 0)
      alert(2)
    }
</script>
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JavaScript [as a script] is single threaded, but the Browser it runs on can utilize the multithreading capability of the OS.

If a programmer requires, there are multiple ways to make Javascript code chunks run in a multi-threaded environment:

  1. Using setTimeout() method which queues a piece of chunk passed to it as a parameter.
  2. Using ActiveX/Applet/Flash components: Which are native code running inside browser or as a separate process. Javascript can obtain control to these components and can invoke methods upon them.

Also, all AJAX calls are multithreaded as they happen thru ActiveX and supports callbacks.

Hence the notion of JavaScript being single threaded is wrong... It limits the user from creating and manipulating threads.

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