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Is there any way to debug a bash script? E.g something that prints a sort of execution log like "calling line 1", "calling line 2" etc.

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1  
There is a similar question here: serverfault.com/questions/16204/… –  Dennis Williamson Jun 4 '09 at 22:48

7 Answers 7

up vote 85 down vote accepted
sh -x script [arg1 ...]
bash -x script [arg1 ...]

These give you a trace of what is being executed. (See also 'Clarification' near the bottom of the answer.)

Sometimes, you need to control the debugging within the script. In that case, as Cheeto reminded me, you can use:

set -x

This turns debugging on. You can then turn it off again with:

set +x

Also, shells generally provide options '-n' for 'no execution' and '-v' for 'verbose' mode; you can use these in combination to see whether the shell thinks it could execute your script - occasionally useful if you have an unbalanced quote somewhere.


There is contention that the '-x' option in Bash is different from other shells (see the comments). The Bash Manual says:

  • -x

    Print a trace of simple commands, for commands, case commands, select commands, and arithmetic for commands and their arguments or associated word lists after they are expanded and before they are executed. The value of the PS4 variable is expanded and the resultant value is printed before the command and its expanded arguments.

That much does not seem to indicate different behaviour at all. I don't see any other relevant references to '-x' in the manual. It does not describe differences in the startup sequence.

Clarification: On systems such as a typical Linux box, where '/bin/sh' is a symlink to '/bin/bash' (or to any Bash executable), the two command lines achieve the identical effect. On other systems (for example, Solaris), /bin/sh is not Bash, and the two command lines would give (slightly) different results; most notably, '/bin/sh' would be confused by constructs in Bash that it does not recognize at all. When invoked by name like this, the 'shebang' line ('#!/bin/bash' vs '#!/bin/sh') at the start of the file has no effect on how the contents are interpreted. I've not found anything in the Bash Manual that indicates different behaviour from Bash depending on whether it is invoked as 'sh' or 'bash'.

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1  
He did specify a bash script. And running a bash script with sh -x will cause it to behave completely different! Please update your answer. –  lhunath Jun 4 '09 at 16:11
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There are differences, in startup and under runtime. They're fully documented in the Bash distribution. –  TheBonsai Jun 4 '09 at 19:14
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Let me clarify: Running a bash script with sh causes the interpreter to disable (almost) all bash-features, leaving only the POSIX ones. Since OP said his script was a bash script, it should not be ran with sh. If it is, masses of errors will follow; unexpected behaviour; and depending on the script, really bad stuff could happen like files getting deleted and so on. –  lhunath Jun 4 '09 at 20:43
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Here's a link to the bash doc: gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bashref.html#Bash-Startup-Files 'If Bash is invoked with the name sh, it tries to mimic the startup behavior of historical versions of sh as closely as possible, while conforming to the posix standard as well' –  thethinman Jan 15 '10 at 21:06
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And use the PS4 prompt to give more useful information like: export PS4='+(${BASH_SOURCE}:${LINENO}): ${FUNCNAME[0]:+${FUNCNAME[0]}(): }' –  estani Sep 17 '12 at 10:15

I've used the following methods to debug my script.

set -e makes the script stop immediately if any external program returns a non-zero exit status. This is useful if your script attempts to handle all error cases and where a failure to do so should be trapped.

set -x was mentioned above and is certainly the most useful of all the debugging methods.

set -n might also be useful if you want to check your script for syntax errors.

strace is also useful to see what's going on. Especially useful if you haven't written the script yourself.

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Stracing a script (i.e. stracing a shell executing the script) is a strange shell debugging method (but may work for a limited set of issues). –  TheBonsai Jun 4 '09 at 19:17
    
I admit it is strange and also very verbose, but if you limit the output of strace to a few syscalls, it becomes useful. –  FD Gonthier Jun 4 '09 at 20:12
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Note that strace -f is needed if you also want to find errors in the processes started by the script. (which makes it many times more verbose, but still useful if you limit it to the syscalls you're interested in). –  Random832 Apr 6 '11 at 0:36

You can also write "set -x" within the script.

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And you can write 'set +x' to turn it off. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 4 '09 at 15:49

This answer is valid and useful: http://stackoverflow.com/a/951352

But, I find that the "standard" script debugging methods are inefficient, unintuitive, and hard to use. For those used to sophisticated GUI debuggers that put everything at your fingertips and make the job a breeze for easy problems (and possible for hard problems), these solutions aren't very satisfactory.

What I do is use a combination of DDD and bashdb. The former executes the latter, and the latter executes your script. This provides a multi-window UI with the ability to step through code in context and view variables, stack, etc., without the constant mental effort to maintain context in your head or keep re-listing the source.

There is guidance on setting that up here: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=660223

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Just discovered ddd thanks to your answer. In Ubuntu 12.04.3 (64bit), the apt-sources version doesn't work. I had to compile & install from source to start debugging my bash script. The instructions here - askubuntu.com/questions/156906/… helped. –  chronodekar Oct 18 '13 at 9:20
    
Yes, that's a problem. I solved it some time back with some scripting -- 'dddbash' installs/builds DDD, removes the old version if its wrong, installs bashdb, etc. (Answer has been edited with this info now) –  Stabledog Feb 26 at 15:14

I built a Bash debugger. Just give it a try. I hope it will help https://sourceforge.net/projects/bashdebugingbash

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Are you interested in help translating that to English? My Spanish is un poco debil, pero mas que nada... :) –  Stabledog Feb 26 at 15:17
    
BDB is currently supported in English and Spanish languages. To change the language, edit the file /etc/default/bdb –  abadjm Mar 1 at 5:06
    
Yes, I understand that. But the English translation could use some refinement, if you'll forgive the feedback. It's hard to understand. I'm offering to improve it -- because I do speak and read Spanish (not perfectly), and my English skills are very good. –  Stabledog Mar 2 at 16:05
    
OK, go on ... let me know what you need, all sources are public in sourceforge.net/projects/bashdebugingbash. Some improvements will be done soon with version 0.8.0 but texts remain practically idem. Just in case, you can contact me directly at abadjm AT gmail.com –  abadjm Mar 3 at 18:57
    
the screenshot looks interesting but I couldnt make it run "bdb.sh: line 32: bdbSTR[1]: unbound variable"; btw will it show the current values of all set variables each step we do on the code? –  Aquarius Power Jun 26 at 0:46

I found shellcheck utility and may be some folks find it interesting https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck

A little example:

$ cat test.sh 
ARRAY=("hello there" world)

for x in $ARRAY; do
  echo $x
done

$ shellcheck test.sh 

In test.sh line 3:
for x in $ARRAY; do
         ^-- SC2128: Expanding an array without an index only gives the first element.

fix the bug, first try...

$ cat test.sh       
ARRAY=("hello there" world)

for x in ${ARRAY[@]}; do
  echo $x
done

$ shellcheck test.sh

In test.sh line 3:
for x in ${ARRAY[@]}; do
         ^-- SC2068: Double quote array expansions, otherwise they're like $* and break on spaces.

Let's try again...

$ cat test.sh 
ARRAY=("hello there" world)

for x in "${ARRAY[@]}"; do
  echo $x
done

$ shellcheck test.sh

find now!

It's just a small example.

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I think you can try this Bash debugger: http://bashdb.sourceforge.net/.

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