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first of all here is my situation. I am programming an intranet application using ASP.NET MVC 3 with Entity Framework 4.1. My application has been developed using the "Unit of Work" and "Repository" design patterns.

How ever in my opinion it should go the way that my application has an unit of work that provides a central access to all the repositories which further provide access to the entities.

Lets say I have a entity called "ProductApprovalDocument" with the properties "id", "creationDate" and "approvalDecission" stored in the database. Now I want the user to be able to access a PDF file of the document thats shortly described by the entity. Because the files are stored in a central directory on a file server using the URL format "[fileServerDirectoryPath]/[ProductApprovalDocument.id].pdf", I do not want to save an extra property for that filepath on the database. What I would like to do, is give the entity an extra property called "filepath" that automatically constructs the path with the given information and returns it.

Now the Problem:

I use an interface called FileService to abstract file access from the rest of the application. Now in my case I would have to access the UnitOfWork object out of the entity model, to retrieve the current FileService implementetion and get the preconfigured filepath. I think that's the totaly wrong way because to me an entity model should only be used as a data container not more or less.

Now the Question:

How do I handle such a situation. I would not like to always set the filepath property through the controller because ist more or less static and therefore could be done somehow automatic by the model.

Edit (final solution):

Thanks to the answer of Andre Loker I gained another point of view to my problem.

  • What was the central target I wanted to reach?
    • I wanted the user to gain access to a file stored on a fileserver.
  • Do I have to provide every displayed entity with the total filepath?
    • No! Think about the principle of MVC! User actions get processed by the controller just in time. You don't have to provide information untill it really get's used.

So the solution is just to render all data as usual but instead of displaying a static html link to the files, you have to include an ActionLink to the Controller which calculates the filepath on the fly and automatically redirects the user to the file.

In the View do this:

@Html.ActionLink(Model.ID.ToString(), "ShowProductApprovalDocumentFile", "ProductApprovalDocument", new { ProductApprovalDocumentID = Model.ID }, null)

instead of this:

<a href="@Model.FilePath">@Model.ID</a>

And add an corresponding Action to the controller:

public ActionResult ShowProductApprovalDocumentFile(int ProductApprovalDocumentID )
{
   return Redirect(_unitOfWork.FileService.GetFilePathForProductApprovalDocument(ProductApprovalDocumentID));
}

Thanks to the guys that took the time to give me an answer and special thanks to Andre who lead me to the satisfying answer! :)

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure I understand your issue correctly. What's the roe of FileService? Is it used to generate the file path from the document id? Or is it used to actually retrieve the file? What is its relation to the unit of work? –  Andre Loker Mar 1 '12 at 9:27
    
FileService is used for general file system access through the mvc application e.g. accessing, storing and/or automatic versioning files depending on the type of implementation. In other words, my application is by far more complex than I've described it here. And yes I also use it to generate the Filepath to grant a central place for that in order to be flexible for future changes –  Da_Wolf Mar 1 '12 at 9:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I understand the property correctly, there are several options:

1) Make the FilePath property use a service locator to find the FileService:

public string FilePath {
    get {
        FileService fileService = DependencyResolver.Current.GetService<FileService>();
        return fileService.GetFilePathForDocument(this);
    }
}

While I'm not a hugh fan of static service locators as they make testing more difficult, this could be a viable option. To make it more easily testable you can make the file service locator injectable:

private static readonly Func<FileService> defaultFileServiceLocator = ()=>DependencyResolver.Current.GetService<FileService>():
private Func<FileService> fileServiceLocator = defaultFileServiceLocator;

public Func<FileService> FileServiceLocator { 
    get { return fileServiceLocator; }
    set { fileServiceLocator = value ?? defaultFileServiceLocator; }
}

And then use this in FilePath

public string FilePath {
    get {
        FileService fileService = fileServiceLocator();
        return fileService.GetFilePathForDocument(this);
    }
}

This way you can inject your own file service locator during testing.

2) Explicitly require the FileService when retrieving the file path. Instead of a FilePath property you'd have:

public string GetFilePath(FileService service){
    service.GetFilePathForDocument(this);
}

The problem with this is of course that now the caller of GetFilePath needs to have a FileService. This isn't much of a problem for controllers, because if you use an IoC you can inject a FileService into the controller constructor. This approach is the cleaner one as it doesn't depend on service locators, but as you see it is slightly more inconvenient for the caller.

3) Inject the FileService into the document class itself.

Instead of using a file service locator you'd inject the file service itself when you construct your ProductApprovalDocument. With this approach you can use a simple FilePath property again. The main problem is that this often doesn't play too well with ORMs, as they often construct the objects using a default constructor and you'd have to somehow hook into the object construction process to inject the dependencies. Also, I'm not a big fan of injection services into domain objects.

4) You set the FilePath from outside the entity. As you said this should be done somewhat automatically as you don't want to do it manually every time. This would require some layer through which all entities need to pass which sets up the FilePath property.

5) Don't make FilePath a property of ProductApprovalDocument at all. This would be a reasonable choice, too. ProductApprovalDocument doesn't know anything about its FilePath, so why should it be a property? Its the FileService that calculates the value. You can still have a distinct view model version of ProductApprovalDocument which does have a FilePath property. You'd set the property when you create your view model:

var model = new ProductApprovalDocumentViewModel();
mapper.Map(realDocument, model); // map common properties with AutoMapper or so
model.FilePath = fileService.GetFilePathForDocument(realDocument);

However, if ProductApprovalDocument needs to do something with its FilePath (why would it?) this approach doesn't work anymore.

Personally I'd go with solution 5, 2 or 1 in that order of precedence, where applicable.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice answers I'll try it out, seems as I'd use no. 5 –  Da_Wolf Mar 1 '12 at 10:12
    
I've got solution no. 6 => do not use filePath at all, just place a ActionLink to the controller with ProductApprovalDocument ID as value and let the controller create the filepath dynamically using the fileService accessed through the unit of work instance wich is a legal way and then redirect the user using the created filepath –  Da_Wolf Mar 1 '12 at 11:01

Whilst I would be hesitant to rely on being able to calculate the filepath and I would prefer to store it as part of the entity (in case it ever needs to change for some reason), in your situation if I was adamant I wanted to do it the way you've said, I think I would extend the FileService/ViewModel to have a Filepath property which was derived in the fashion you have stated.

e.g. if I wanted to create a download link I'd do this in the ViewModel

public string FilePath
{
   get
   {
      return String.Format(@"thehardcodedbit{0}.pdf",ID);
   }
}

EDIT: If you have an Entity generated by EF4.x then it will have been generated as a partial class so you could always extend it like this (I have done this sort of thing and it works okay):

Say the generated entity looks like this:

Namespace Da_Wolf.Model.Entities.File
{
   public partial class UploadedFile
   {....}
}

Then you could create a partial class like this:

Namespace Da_Wolf.Model.Entities.File
{
   public partial class UploadedFile
   {
     public string FilePath
     {
        get
        {
           return String.Format(@"thehardcodedbit{0}.pdf",ID);
        }
     }  
   }
}

Now you have the property you desire available everywhere without adding anything to the ViewModels.

share|improve this answer
    
That's exactly the way I wanted to do it but my problem is that i access that Model through other models e.g. the document belongs to a "Product" entity and i have a index page listing all the products with some data including the id of the "ProductApprovalDocument", enabling the user to klick on that ID and open the file, think you know what I mean. Now as I understand your solution I would have to adjust all my ViewModels that have somehow to gain access to the file, in order to provide that filepath property. Further more I'd like to be flexible for future changes in the storage path –  Da_Wolf Mar 1 '12 at 9:43
    
Is this new edit of any use? –  Tom Chantler Mar 1 '12 at 9:52
    
Thanks for explanation, but I am already using the possibility to extend my entities with partial classes and I don't know how this could help me. Because my problem is that I would not like to include a static, but a path that is changeable in future. The path is stored in my web.config file so I could also retrieve it through "ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["MyStoragePath"]" but I was wondering if that is a practicable solution. –  Da_Wolf Mar 1 '12 at 10:00

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