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This XML file is named example.xml:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/maven-v4_0_0.xsd">

  <modelVersion>14.0.0</modelVersion>
  <groupId>.com.foobar.flubber</groupId>
  <artifactId>uberportalconf</artifactId>
  <version>13-SNAPSHOT</version>
  <packaging>pom</packaging>
  <name>Environment for UberPortalConf</name>
  <description>This is the description</description>    
  <properties>
      <birduberportal.version>11</birduberportal.version>
      <promotiondevice.version>9</promotiondevice.version>
      <foobarportal.version>6</foobarportal.version>
      <eventuberdevice.version>2</eventuberdevice.version>
  </properties>
  <!-- A lot more here, but as it is irrelevant for the problem I have removed it -->
</project>

If I load example.xml and parse it with ElementTree I can see its namespace is http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0.

>>> from xml.etree import ElementTree
>>> tree = ElementTree.parse('example.xml')
>>> print tree.getroot()
<Element '{http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0}project' at 0x26ee0f0>

I have not found a method to call to get just the namespace from an Element without resorting to parsing the str(an_element) of an Element. It seems like there got to be a better way.

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do you know how to use the find method in this cases? it didnt work here... –  caarlos0 May 5 '12 at 3:48

5 Answers 5

The namespace should be in Element.tag right before the "actual" tag:

>>> root = tree.getroot()
>>> root.tag
'{http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0}project'

To know more about namespaces, take a look at ElementTree: Working with Namespaces and Qualified Names.

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I am not sure if this is possible with xml.etree, but here is how you could do it with lxml.etree:

>>> from lxml import etree
>>> tree = etree.parse('example.xml')
>>> tree.xpath('namespace-uri(.)')
'http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0'
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1  
I get unresolved import: etree using Python 2.7.2 in Windows. xpath wasn´t available as a method when using xml.etree and if I use find() (which supports xpath expressions) the 'namespace-uri(.)' statement still doesn´t work. –  Deleted Mar 2 '12 at 14:55

This is a perfect task for a regular expression.

import re

def namespace(element):
    m = re.match('\{.*\}', element.tag)
    return m.group(0) if m else ''
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1  
After fighting for a while with this issue, this is the best solution I found. I can't believe that the API don't get you a way to ask for the namespace and, at the same time, it doesn't return the attribute 'xmlns' when doing 'rootElement.keys()'. Sure there is a good reason for that but I can't find it at this moment. –  Robert Jul 9 at 18:03

I think it will be easier to take a look at the attributes:

>>> root.attrib
{'{http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance}schemaLocation':
   'http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/maven-v4_0_0.xsd'}
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Certainly easier than parsing str(the_element). But I guess parsing the_element.tag is even a bit easier. As I am only interested in the namespace. What do you think? –  Deleted Mar 2 '12 at 15:13
1  
I think that @RikPoggi's answer seems the best one (actually, I upvoted it). In fact, getting the namespace should be as easy as re.search('\{(.*)\}', the_element.tag).group(1). With my answer it looks you could use the_element.attrib.values()[0].split()[0], but, indeed, it doesn't look so much straightforward and it isn't guaranteed that you won't get any other attributes in the future. –  jcollado Mar 2 '12 at 15:21

Without using regular expressions:

>>> root
<Element '{http://www.google.com/schemas/sitemap/0.84}urlset' at 0x2f7cc10>

>>> root.tag.split('}')[0].strip('{')
'http://www.google.com/schemas/sitemap/0.84'
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